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      11-26-2012, 04:16 PM   #25
gpb
First Lieutenant
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Drives: 335i Cabrio
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Atlanta

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reznick View Post
Never seize or a little light grease is fine and won't affect you're torque specs enough to matter.What you're truly doing is "stretching" the thread between the nut and bolt.A thin coat of never seize isn't going to stop the threads from stretching. I'm sure there is a good argument for not doing this, but in my 25 + years of changing brakes and torquing wheels , I've never had any ill effects from using never seize.BUt as time has gone on there is more and more literature saying not to use it and its unnecessary and it can actually lead to premature wear. Manufacturing changes. Things change. You should always do what the owners manual says. In my case its a old habits dying hard....and I'll admit it
Ha, I see you're in Syracuse. Brings back memories; I spent much of my life in the Finger Lakes region.

Good clarification. Indeed, you're stretching the bolt, effectively putting tension on the threads and sort of "locking" the bolt in place. (gross generalization alert for increasing static friction by pulling the thread surfaces together) Many times the torque spec has a lot of wiggle room, so adding a compound may not have a true effect.

Funny you mention old habits and times changing. I always used Never-Seez on wheel studs and "torqued" wheel bolts by feel back 25+ years ago. Never had a problem, and never had to pull out a torch to get a wheel nut to let go either. Over time I've changed habits and techniques, though I admit I still just go by feel on a lot of stuff. Not exactly practicing what I preach, but I grew up with a dad who rebuilt cars for a hobby I try to be conservative in anything I write here; no telling what level of expertise the reader has. Someone experienced like you are, who pays close attention to things, is a lot different from the fellow (or lady) who has Google whether it's clockwise to tighten or the other way around.