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Replaced my brake pads in my 335!
Published by Mr. 5
08-04-2007
Replaced my brake pads in my 335!

First of all, Do this at your own risk! Although this is somewhat an easy task, you are dealing with the brakes in your car! I take no responsibility for the mistakes that you make and this is just a guide for those who want to do the work themselves.
Now, since all of that mumbo jumbo is out of the way--

You will need the following:

17mm socket (For lug nuts)
18mm socket (Front Brakes)
16mm socket (Rear Brakes)
C clamp
Brake Cleaner
CRC Disc Brake Quiet


1. Take your 17mm socket and wrench and crack loose the bolts on your wheel. Just crack them loose. Do not completely loosen the bolts since your car is not jacked up. This is much better than trying to loosen the bolts while the wheel is spinning when it's up in the air.



2. Once every lug is cracked loose, then jack up the car. I used a hockey puck for a spacer in between my jack and the car. Support the car with jack stands.



3. Once the wheel is off then it will look like this.



4. Find the two 18mm bolts (16mm for the rear) in the inner side of the caliper. There is one at the bottom of the caliper and one at the top. In this picture you can only see the bottom bolt, but it looks the same as the bolt on the top.



5. Before taking these bolts off, find a stand of some sort. I've always used a gallon paint can in the past since it's the perfect height for the caliper to rest on while changing the pads. So take the caliper off of the rotor and rest it on your stand.



6. Find the brake pad sensor. There is only one sensor in the front and one in the back. My sensors were on the driver's side front wheel and the passenger's side rear wheel. Take off this sensor by pulling it straight out. Sometimes the metal clip will stay on the OEM pad but this can easily be taken off once the pad has been changed.



7. While your old pads are still in place, Get your C clamp and put one end on the inner pad and the other on the outside of the caliper. Tighten the C clamp to put the piston of the caliper back to the original position creating a bigger space for the new pads. DO NOT OVER TIGHTEN! YOU WILL FEEL WHEN THE PISTON WON'T BE ABLE TO TRAVEL ANY MORE! This is very important to do especially for very worn pads. The more the pads wear the longer the piston needs to travel. Keep an eye on the fluid in the brake fluid reservoir. The C clamp will be pushing the fluid back into the reservoir making the reservoir fill up more so make sure it doesn’t overflow.



8. Once the C clamp won't tighten any more take out the old pads. There is a clip also that needs to come out to make the installation of the new pads easier. The clips is circled in the picture here.



9. Make sure your new pads have the same characteristics as the older pads--same shape, same size, springs, etc.



10. Apply Brake cleaner to all parts of the caliper that makes direct contact to the pad.

11. Although the pads have their own "anti squeal" backing, I like to use the CRC Disc Brake Quiet to make sure there is a really good contact between the pad and caliper. I put this wherever the caliper touches the pad. Don't freak out about the orange. It will turn black in no time. The dirt will stick to it and turn black.





12. Pop the new pads back into place making sure that the springs (on the pad) are all where they should be. Make sure the springs aren't crimped or bent backwards. When the pad is in place, you should feel a nice pop to let you know that the pads are in the correct position. Do this with both sides. Don't forget to re-install the brake sensor!



13. Now slip the caliper over the rotor and reinstall the bolts just to hold the caliper in place. This should easily fit over the caliper since you used the C clamp to make the space bigger. Do not tighten the bolts yet.

14. Re-attach the clip to look like the picture. It might take a couple tries to get it in place, but when it is in place you will know it. The clip shouldn't move or be loose at all if it is installed directly.



15. Tighten the two caliper bolts, install the tire, and torque the lugs down. Make sure nothing is underneath the car and lower the car.

16. Get in your car and pump the brakes. The first push will seem very light. This is because you are pushing the pads all the way to the rotor. You are positioning the pads on the rotor. I do this after every caliper, but you can wait to do this once the whole job is done.

17. Once you have done all steps 1-16. It is now time to bed in your brakes.
Follow these instructions here.
http://www.zeckhausen.com/bedding_in_brakes.htm

Follow these instructions if installing Cool Carbon Pads:
http://www.coolcarbonperformance.com/bedding.html


Now have a great time with your new brakes!
__________________
e36 M3 Coupe, e36 325i Sedan
e90 335i--SOLD

Best 60-130-------------9.15 Seconds------------------WWW.MR5RACING.COM
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  #1  
By ed-320d on 08-04-2007, 07:47 PM
Well written. Can we have this article in the sticky.
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  #2  
By SMOKE EM IF U GOT EM!! on 08-04-2007, 10:16 PM
damn good write up man. how do they feel?
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  #3  
By S4to335 on 08-04-2007, 10:36 PM
Mr. 5...you are to be commended on the DIY...make sure you email the moderator/admins to add it to the site. EXCELLENT JOB.
Last edited by S4to335; 08-20-2007 at 11:50 PM.
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  #4  
By Mr. 5 on 08-04-2007, 11:22 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by SMOKE EM IF U GOT EM!! View Post
damn good write up man. how do they feel?
They feel absolutely great!

Quote:
Originally Posted by S4to335 View Post
Mr. 5...you are to commended on the DIY...make sure you email the moderator/admins to add it to the site. EXCELLENT JOB.
Thanks for the props man!
I was doing the install and I was thinking maybe I'll take a couple pics and write about it...so I did.
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  #5  
By crawfoj on 08-05-2007, 12:44 AM
Thanks for the info!

- john
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  #6  
By Spool on 08-05-2007, 05:32 PM
Awesome write up.

For those that are intimidated by this DIY, don't be, once you open everything up it's common sense and this DIY is a great guide.
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  #7  
By Mr. 5 on 08-06-2007, 11:55 AM
I emailed the admins but I got no response.
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  #8  
By uberschnell on 08-06-2007, 12:59 PM
Great write up.

One thing, It would probably be better to recommend you pump the brakes after each wheel is done. Two reasons, 1- You will probably over-flow the reservoir with 4 brake sets pushed completely back, 2- This way you’ll know which wheel (of the two that have sensors) is causing a problem if the sensor light comes on.

Now, follow up with a road test!
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  #9  
By Mr. 5 on 08-06-2007, 01:34 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magna3 View Post
Great write up.

One thing, It would probably be better to recommend you pump the brakes after each wheel is done. Two reasons, 1- You will probably over-flow the reservoir with 4 brake sets pushed completely back, 2- This way you’ll know which wheel (of the two that have sensors) is causing a problem if the sensor light comes on.

Now, follow up with a road test!
This is one of the resons why I said that I did it, but if people are just replacing the front then a lot of the times they are fine with doing it after you are completely done.

About the sensor, it is only on one of the wheels in the front and one of the wheels in the rear, so it narrows it down already.
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  #10  
By Mr. 5 on 08-08-2007, 11:54 AM
bump for some love from the admins.
I've PMd Mark and Jason, and I've gotten no responses.

Who else could I contact?
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  #11  
By jondrew on 08-08-2007, 11:56 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. 5 View Post

2. Once every lug is cracked loose, then jack up the car. I used a hockey puck for a spacer in between my jack and the car. Support the car with jack stands.



:
Thanks for the DIY. A simple job, but I like seeing put out like this with good pics.

2 Comments:

1) Where did you put the jackstands? Did you do one wheel at a time?


2) Thanks for giving me an idea of what to do with my old hockey puck.

Again, great write up.
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  #12  
By Mr. 5 on 08-08-2007, 12:12 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by jondrew View Post
Thanks for the DIY. A simple job, but I like seeing put out like this with good pics.

2 Comments:

1) Where did you put the jackstands? Did you do one wheel at a time?


2) Thanks for giving me an idea of what to do with my old hockey puck.

Again, great write up.
I put the jack stands under the wheel frame (if that's what you call it).
All I have to say is to find a secure place to fit your jack stands.

I did do one wheel at a time. Once I was done with the brakes at that one wheel then I installed everything back, lowered the car, pumped the brakes, and then started on the other wheel.
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  #13  
By cn555ic on 08-08-2007, 09:51 PM
hows the brake dust after??? I am getting them for front and rears!!! need feedback if it does indeed induce little dust!
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  #14  
By Mr. 5 on 08-08-2007, 10:15 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by cn555ic View Post
hows the brake dust after??? I am getting them for front and rears!!! need feedback if it does indeed induce little dust!
The dust is great with these pads.
The only dust on my wheels are left over from my stock pads.
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  #15  
By -JLT- on 08-08-2007, 11:57 PM
do the new pads make squeaking noises?
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  #16  
By Mr. 5 on 08-09-2007, 10:30 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by jte92 View Post
do the new pads make squeaking noises?
Not at all!
Make sure you bed in your brakes correctly and you won't have this problem.
Also, the CRC helps this from happening.

A lot of people don't know this, but usually when you hear the squealing noise coming from the brakes, the squealing is coming from the pads vibrating against the caliper and not from the pads squealing against the rotor.
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  #17  
By BMWCali on 08-20-2007, 09:19 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. 5 View Post
A lot of people don't know this, but usually when you hear the squealing noise coming from the brakes, the squealing is coming from the pads vibrating against the caliper and not from the pads squealing against the rotor.
So how would that be corrected then? New brake pads needed?
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  #18  
By cn555ic on 08-20-2007, 09:23 PM
He used some kind of gel between pad and the caliper wear the pad fits into...See post above!!!!
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  #19  
By BMWCali on 08-20-2007, 09:26 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by cn555ic View Post
He used some kind of gel between pad and the caliper wear the pad fits into...See post above!!!!
He used brake quiet gel to eliminate squeaking from the pad touching the rotor, not the other way around.
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  #20  
By KL2DC on 08-20-2007, 09:32 PM
very nice write up, well done!

Admins please add to the DIY master list. Thank you.
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  #21  
By S4to335 on 08-20-2007, 11:52 PM
My car is too low to get any hockey pucks in there..my jack barely gets under there as it is..
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