E90Post
 


TireRack
 
BMW 3-Series (E90 E92) Forum > E90 / E92 / E93 3-series Technical Forums > DIY Guides > N52 Oil Filter Housing Gasket DIY



Comment
 
Tutorial Tools Search this Tutorial
N52 Oil Filter Housing Gasket DIY
Published by BlackDesertTango
01-07-2012
Talking N52 Oil Filter Housing Gasket DIY

Preface: I'm aware that there is already a DIY for this. I'm creating this DIY to help other owners like me (who are only familiar with basic maintenance tasks). I want to state the procedure, some issues I encountered along the way and my alternative solutions to them. Beware: Do this at your own risk, I do not hold any liability against accidents or damage made to your vehicle, physical injury or death to you or anyone else performing these tasks. Take caution and when you need assistance, seek help from a professional.

Problem: Leaking N52 Oil Filter Housing Gasket

Solution: Replacing Gasket 11427537293 (# retrieved from realoem)

Abstract:

1.Remove Engine Cover with T45 bit , oil pressure switch
2.Remove oil filter housing cap, oil filter, oil, and clean
3.Remove (3) 8mm bolts mounting Oil Filter Housing
4.Remove old gasket and clean contact surfaces
5.Install new gasket
6.Reinstall engine cover, 3 bolts on housing, oil filter, oil filter cap. Check for
leaks!

Tools Used:

T45 Torx bit
8mm bit + 3/8 rachet
3/8 flexible 6" extension
8mm box end wrench
Oil Filter Cap Wrench
Metal Pick
Nitrile Gloves for hand and to cover housing ports
Aluminum to cover alternator

Suggested time: 1-2 hours + account time for coolant change and venting. Actual time: 4 hours [I was cleaning and taking pictures for this DIY too] Level of expertise: Iʼm a Beginner
Cost: +- $20 for gasket + Coolant change additional +-$20

Special Notes: This DIY eliminates the step of removing the intake manifold to get to the hard to reach bolt.
*It is recommended to drain, fill, & vent Engine Coolant for this procedure.
Coolant Change Courtesy of e90post member Entity
http://www.e90post.com/forums/ showthread.php?t=248187

Download the PDF attachment to view the Step-by-Step DIY. Pictures are included.
__________________
2006 330 Premium Package AT Steptronic
Tutorial Tools
Attached Images
File Type: pdf N52OilFilterHousingGasketDIY.pdf (450.8 KB, 3139 views)
  #1  
By queensfield on 01-07-2012, 03:12 AM
Lovely and thanks for writing the DIY with pictures. It does take a substantial effort, especially with pictures. Four questions-
1. Did yours had gasket material in the coolant when you drained it?
2. Was there any evidence of coolant mixing in with the oil?
3. I couldn't tell from the picture, but were you able to get the original finish back and remove all the old gasket material from the groove?
4. Is there a spec on the torque for the 3 bolts? or Should one tighten them to until they feel tight enough- like you stated.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
By AlanAZ on 01-07-2012, 11:10 AM
Member reviews
Difficulty [ 1 = Difficult ]
20%20%20%
1
Cost [ 1 = Expensive ]
20%20%20%
1
DIY Clarity [ 1 = Not clear ]
20%20%20%
1
Average 20%
Nice job! Thank you, I'll be doing this in a month. The photos help a lot.

Just a couple of comments (updated):

The engine cover doesn't need to be unbolted -- just pull it straight up, it has fittings that push into rubber. To re-fit, align and push down. I spayed the rubber bushings with silicone so they go on and off easier.

Turkey baster is a good idea, or if you have a vacuum brake bleeder as I do, using new pvc hose from the hardware with it would work well. I drained about 1/2 gallon of coolant first, (I cut the top off a harder plastic (Arrowhead) clean 1 gal water container, and notched it so I could undo the drain plug with large flat-blade screwdriver),and put i back after (I had done a coolant change 15K mls ago.)

A plastic putty knife from the hardware (paint section) works well to scrape gasket material off (plastic doesn't scratch the aluminum) didn't work at all. I used metal polish, cleaning any residual with alcohol and then MAF cleaner.

If you're doing this as preventive maintenance, and can pick the when, best to do it right before an oil change. That way, any contamination of the oil, you're changing it out. I did an oil change a few days later, after I saw that the gasket change was good.

You might want to also protect your serpentine belt with a kitchen garage bag draped over it. Looks like you used aluminum foil on the alternator? Smart. Q-tips were helpful cleaning up the leaked oil from all the little nooks and crannies.

Try to break the troublesome rear bolt loose with a box-end wrench, positioned going forward and towards the head, then switch to under the intake runners. And if your box wrench is well used, clean it with alcohol. The shape of the E-Torx makes the box wrench ride up and off, and if your wrench is dirty with old grease and oil (as mine was), it will ride up even easier. I rounded my bolt head off, and had to move the intake manifold over to get the proper E-Torx socket in and the bolt out -- what a royal pain. And the Bentley was of little help, they described how to remove the manifold with the engine OUT OF THE CAR. Much of what they described, you couldn't see, much less get to with your hands.

When tightening the bolts, apply pressure to the gasket evenly, a bit of a turn on each, rotating around. I coated the both ends of the new gasket with oil when installing. And a drop of blue Loctite on each bolt.

I then primed the housing with oil where I removed it before, reinstalled the filter and cap.

Wear gloves, oil and coolant, and cleaners are toxic.
Last edited by AlanAZ; 11-18-2012 at 12:20 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
By ENINTY on 01-07-2012, 12:14 PM
Member reviews
Difficulty [ 1 = Difficult ]
20%20%20%
1
Cost [ 1 = Expensive ]
20%20%20%
1
DIY Clarity [ 1 = Not clear ]
20%20%20%
1
Average 20%
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlanAZ View Post
Nice job! Thank you, I'll be doing this in a month. The photos help a lot.

Just a couple of comments:

The engine cover doesn't need to be unbolted -- just pull it straight up, it has fittings that push into rubber. To re-fit, align and push down.

Turkey baster is a good idea, or if you have a vacuum brake bleeder as I do, using new pvc hose from the hardware with it would work well.

A plastic scrape tool from the hardware (paint section?) works well to scrape gasket material off (plastic doesn't scratch the aluminum.)

If you're doing this as preventive maintenance, and can pick the when, best to do it right before an oil change. That way, any contamination of the oil, you're changing it out. I'll do an oil change the next day, after I see that the gasket change is good.

You might want to also protect your serpentine belt with a kitchen garage bag draped over it. Looks like you used aluminum foil on the alternator? Smart.

When tightening the bolts, apply pressure to the gasket evenly, a bit of a turn on each, rotating around.

Wear gloves, oil and coolant, plus brake cleaner are toxic.
Well this is true but not the way it was designed to be removed. The engine cover bolts screw into a metal bracket. The metal bracket is what is attached to the valve cover using rubber grommets. The proper removal procedure is to use the bolts.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
By Snyperx on 01-07-2012, 12:54 PM
Wish I had this guide last night. I had a hell of a time with the bolt under the manifold. I was going to take the oil pressure switch out, but opted not too out of fear of ruining.

As for torquing the bolts down, I stops wrenching when the bolt stopped moving not going beyond that point. Hope that was right.

Also When cleaning the mounting plate I used a razor-blade paint scrapper to get all the crude off wiping down with brake cleaner. Cleaned the housing with brake cleaner and blue shop towels.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
By BlackDesertTango on 01-11-2012, 06:03 PM
Member reviews
Difficulty [ 1 = Difficult ]
80%80%80%
4
Cost [ 1 = Expensive ]
100%100%100%
5
DIY Clarity [ 1 = Not clear ]
80%80%80%
4
Average 87%
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snyperx View Post
Wish I had this guide last night. I had a hell of a time with the bolt under the manifold. I was going to take the oil pressure switch out, but opted not too out of fear of ruining.

As for torquing the bolts down, I stops wrenching when the bolt stopped moving not going beyond that point. Hope that was right.

Also When cleaning the mounting plate I used a razor-blade paint scrapper to get all the crude off wiping down with brake cleaner. Cleaned the housing with brake cleaner and blue shop towels.
Sorry I had all the pictures ready because I had done the procedure during Christmas holidays. Yeah, you did it right on the bolts. At least in the future you know that this DIY isn't such a big deal.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
By BlackDesertTango on 01-11-2012, 06:10 PM
Member reviews
Difficulty [ 1 = Difficult ]
80%80%80%
4
Cost [ 1 = Expensive ]
100%100%100%
5
DIY Clarity [ 1 = Not clear ]
80%80%80%
4
Average 87%
Quote:
Originally Posted by queensfield View Post
Lovely and thanks for writing the DIY with pictures. It does take a substantial effort, especially with pictures. Four questions-
1. Did yours had gasket material in the coolant when you drained it?
2. Was there any evidence of coolant mixing in with the oil?
3. I couldn't tell from the picture, but were you able to get the original finish back and remove all the old gasket material from the groove?
4. Is there a spec on the torque for the 3 bolts? or Should one tighten them to until they feel tight enough- like you stated.
1.The gasket was not present in the coolant. The gasket did appear to be flattened. My guess is that it was over-torqued at the factory or just flattened by pressure made by the expansion of the metal surfaces.

2.No sign of mixing of oil in the coolant. If there is any mixing I would highly recommend inspecting your head gasket for leaks because that would a be a probable cause.

3.I was close to getting the original finish but there were some spots of the on the contact surface where the old gasket had residual markings. As long as the surface is clean and not scratched-I wouldn't be worried. Plastic paint scraper was a good recommendation that would work.

4.Yeah just tighten them until they are tight. There are three bolts so cross tighten them slowly.

Beginner's tip. Take your time. Start early. If your running late-sleep on it and begin early the next day.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
By AlanAZ on 01-12-2012, 04:47 PM
Member reviews
Difficulty [ 1 = Difficult ]
20%20%20%
1
Cost [ 1 = Expensive ]
20%20%20%
1
DIY Clarity [ 1 = Not clear ]
20%20%20%
1
Average 20%
One more thought: The areas in the housing where you removed the oil, prime those with oil before putting the filter back in. Your engine will thank you on the first start-up.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
By ENINTY on 01-14-2012, 06:58 AM
Member reviews
Difficulty [ 1 = Difficult ]
20%20%20%
1
Cost [ 1 = Expensive ]
20%20%20%
1
DIY Clarity [ 1 = Not clear ]
20%20%20%
1
Average 20%
It is a use-once profile gasket. It is designed to flatten once the housing is torqued down.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
By BlackDesertTango on 01-14-2012, 07:04 PM
Member reviews
Difficulty [ 1 = Difficult ]
80%80%80%
4
Cost [ 1 = Expensive ]
100%100%100%
5
DIY Clarity [ 1 = Not clear ]
80%80%80%
4
Average 87%
Quote:
Originally Posted by ENINTY View Post
It is a use-once profile gasket. It is designed to flatten once the housing is torqued down.
Thanks Entity, That explains it.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
By 335i101 on 01-16-2012, 01:15 AM
I did this on my N54 yesterday. You have to take off or at minimum loosen the intakes manifold to get to the last screw.

I did not drain coolant, I just shoved a rag in the hole as soon as I removed it.

Also, did anyone who has done this on the n54 replace their manifold gaskets? Dealer sold me those gaskets as well but I didn't swap them out...
Reply With Quote
  #11  
By Novemberr on 02-04-2012, 01:13 PM
Can you guys please post the part # for the bolts to be replaced? I think those are blue painted. Thanks a lot.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
By ENINTY on 02-05-2012, 10:15 AM
Member reviews
Difficulty [ 1 = Difficult ]
20%20%20%
1
Cost [ 1 = Expensive ]
20%20%20%
1
DIY Clarity [ 1 = Not clear ]
20%20%20%
1
Average 20%
Quote:
Originally Posted by Novemberr View Post
Can you guys please post the part # for the bolts to be replaced? I think those are blue painted. Thanks a lot.
The bolts are not blue-headed. They can be re-used.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
By hxs80 on 03-05-2012, 09:42 PM
Member reviews
Difficulty [ 1 = Difficult ]
20%20%20%
1
Cost [ 1 = Expensive ]
20%20%20%
1
DIY Clarity [ 1 = Not clear ]
20%20%20%
1
Average 20%
Did this DIY tonight and it went pretty well. Thanks for the write up and pictures!

As for my experience..

-The hard to reach bolt... I used a small (~5") 8mm ratcheting box wrench. After the initial push to loosen, I went little by little and got the bolt to come out. When it came out enough, I unscrewed it by hand so as to not drop it.

-My gasket wasn't TOO bad but the worse part was the small rectangular section. I could see it has deteriorated into the port and a lot of caked on gasket and oil particles where inside the housing. It seems like it had just smooshed in so much the gasket actually got squished into the port. Initially, I had found some leaking coming from this under area so I'm glad found this thread.

-I found it a bit hard to clean without a second set of hand holding the housing up for me to really get at it. Since the gasket came out in one piece and it wasn't in too bad condition, my helper didn't complain too much.

-When I performed the coolant drain, there was some black particles in the pan.

- I didn't remove the top engine cover. I just removed the two front bolts but, I didn't even have to do that.

e92 328i with 61k miles.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
By Mseg on 05-08-2012, 12:23 AM
Member reviews
Difficulty [ 1 = Difficult ]
60%60%60%
3
Cost [ 1 = Expensive ]
80%80%80%
4
DIY Clarity [ 1 = Not clear ]
100%100%100%
5
Average 80%
Thanks for this DIY

It took me a while to get the bolt near the intake manifold, but after that it was smooth sailing.

Thanks again
Reply With Quote
  #15  
By Val335i on 08-20-2012, 01:47 PM
read this but my problem is that oil is leaking through the top where the cap is i checked the rings and the cap everything seems fine. I dont know whats going on, help please :/
Reply With Quote
  #16  
By b_ro_rainman on 01-07-2013, 02:07 PM
Member reviews
Difficulty [ 1 = Difficult ]
20%20%20%
1
Cost [ 1 = Expensive ]
20%20%20%
1
DIY Clarity [ 1 = Not clear ]
20%20%20%
1
Average 20%
The link for the coolant change is dead.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
By Efthreeoh on 01-09-2013, 09:59 PM
Member reviews
Difficulty [ 1 = Difficult ]
20%20%20%
1
Cost [ 1 = Expensive ]
20%20%20%
1
DIY Clarity [ 1 = Not clear ]
20%20%20%
1
Average 20%
Quote:
Originally Posted by b_ro_rainman View Post
The link for the coolant change is dead.
Here is the word version.
Attached Files
File Type: doc Coolant DY1.doc (35.0 KB, 577 views)
Reply With Quote
Comment

Bookmarks

Tutorial Tools Search this Tutorial
Search this Tutorial:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:27 AM.




e90post
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
1Addicts.com, BIMMERPOST.com, E90Post.com, F30Post.com, M3Post.com, ZPost.com, 5Post.com, 6Post.com, 7Post.com, XBimmers.com logo and trademark are properties of BIMMERPOST