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DIY – Water Pump & Thermostat Replacement (2007 335i w/Automatic Transmission)
Published by Built My Way
12-23-2012
DIY – Water Pump & Thermostat Replacement (2007 335i w/Automatic Transmission)

DIY – Water Pump & Thermostat Replacement (2007 335i w/Automatic Transmission) NOTE: This DIY may be used on other 335i model years and on xi models as well (part numbers may differ).

UPDATE (Feb 16, 2014): BavAuto has put together a great video of the procedure which can be found at the end of this DIY. Thanks to ska325xi for posting.


-Clear any and all water pump related ECU codes first.

-Caution: Only perform procedure when engine is cold.

-This procedure can be completed without having to remove the radiator, cooling fan and intercooler.

-Leave the new pump sealed in bag until ready to install.

-The 3 aluminum bolts for the water pump will have to be replaced as they are designed as a one time installation only.

-Remember to have a gallon of BMW brand coolant on hand to mix 50/50 with deionized water for a total of 2 gallons.

- Important information about the water pump: The latest part # is 11 51 7 632 426 which supercedes part # 11 51 7 563 659 and the original part # 11 51 7 588 885. The current design no longer uses the rubber isolator/spacers at the three bolting locations and thus the aluminum bolts are now made shorter (Part # 11 51 7 602 123) The bolts are now 26mm as opposed to 32mm. Make sure that you have the correct size bolts. (Edit) If you do receive the longer bolts by mistake and can't wait for re-ship, nc1mike recommends cutting 1/8" off the top bolt to prevent it from bottoming out. The other two bolts seem to be fine.

-(Edit: added) The draining procedure in this DIY is a partial flush only. A full flush cannot be performed using an incapacitated pump. A full flush requires removal of the intercooler to gain access to the radiator and activation of the pump. Contact your dealership for full flush coolant capacities. A full flush procedure (for a 330i) can be found in section 1 of the following link:
http://www.bmw330ci.net/maintenance/...lant.php#step1


Tools needed

• Ratchet w/ 3/8 drive
• Ratchet w/ 1/4drive
• Ratchet w/ 1/2 drive
• Universal w/ 3/8 drive
• 6” extension bar w/ 3/8 drive
• 6” extension bar w/ ½ drive
• 10mm socket w/ 3/8 drive
• 6mm socket w/ 1/4 drive
• 8mm socket w/ 1/4 drive
• 13mm socket w/ 1/2drive
• E12 Torx socket w/ 3/8 drive
• 10mm box end wrench
• 6” awl
• Flat head screw drivers
• Torque wrench
• Coolant catch basin
• Trouble light
• Coat hanger or wire
• Rags/paper towel
• Disposable nitrile gloves
• Protective eyewear
• Cat litter for spills
• Empty gallon containers
• Pair of low profile ramps



Let’s Get Started

1. Raise front end of vehicle by driving up onto low profile ramps and apply e-brake.



2. Remove the 16 - 8mm hex head screws securing the engine splash guard from the underside of the vehicle.
3. Open the hood, loosen the coolant reservoir cap and the reservoir bleed screw.
4. Place coolant catch pan under the AT heat exchanger located on the driver’s side under the intercooler at the front of the vehicle.

Note: The majority of the coolant will be drained as a result of the next step after which you may then want to empty the contents into the empty gallon containers to lighten the basin for further usage. Caution: The coolant pours out quickly.

5. Separate the rigid black plastic elbow from the heat exchanger by lifting up the wire spring clip using a small screw driver then pulling the elbow away. Do not twist. Allow coolant to drain then re-attach the plastic hose connection.





6. Remove both aluminum splash guard support brackets located below the sway bar.



7. Remove the four nuts from the two sway bar bushing mounts using the 13mm socket and ½” drive ratchet with extension and carefully let the bar swing down out of the way.



8. Remove the 10mm bolt securing the power steering hose loop to the steering rack (nearer to the u-shaped pipe component). Look for the rubber isolation bracket. Tie back the hose using a length of coat hanger wire.





Note: The next section is thermostat removal which must be accomplished before removing the water pump.

Thermostat Removal

Note: Four hoses need to be removed from the thermostat. The first one is a large u-shaped hose which connects to the water pump’s suction side.

9. Remove the 2 wire thermostat electrical connection by lifting the little metal spring tab using the awl then pull it straight out. Space is limited and if the connector bottoms out on the sub frame before complete separation, gently force it out between the plastic guides.
10. Again position the coolant catch basin, this time under the thermostat and water pump.

Note: Be prepared for more coolant drainage in the next steps. You will get about a pint from the hose in step 11 and trickles from others. Never face directly up at your work and have shop towels at the ready. Also be prepared in the next steps as some hoses are not so easily separated from the thermostat and water pump. The wire spring clip type (like that of the rigid plastic elbow at the AT heat exchanger) can be difficult. These can only be pulled off straight; not twisted off as they are keyed and don’t expect immediate results as the seal inside needs to be broken first. Break the seal by rocking the connection up and down using a fair amount of strength but be patient. Soon, the seal will loosen and break. Don’t fight it by trying to slide it off as well. Conserve your energy and slide the hose off only when you think the seal has been broken.

11. Using the 6mm socket with ¼” drive ratchet, loosen both clamps on hose number one (the large U-shaped hose that goes between the thermostat and the water pump). Note that there are only two water pump hoses. Its tight quarters but the little ¼ drive and socket will do the job. Carefully pry the hose off with a screw driver.





12. Now remove hose number 2 at the front of the thermostat going to the radiator. It’s one of those wire spring clip types with the rigid plastic connection. If you can’t reach the top of the spring to lift up on, try pushing the spring ends up from the underside of the connector.



13. Now remove hose number 3, the smaller diameter hose on top rear with the regular hose clamp.
14. Remove hose number 4, a plastic type. It’s the small one, top front. Rock it first then pull when loose.
15. Grab the 10mm socket with 3/8 drive ratchet and extension bar. Remove the two hex bolts securing the thermostat to the water pump.
16. Pull the thermostat out by working it forward and rotating it between the fan housing and the vehicle frame. Congrats, you removed the thermostat.

Water Pump Removal

17. Remove the 4 wire electrical connector for the water pump by pressing in on the plastic release and pulling back.
18. Using the 6mm socket and ¼ drive ratchet, loosen the clamp on hose #5 (water pump discharge). Do not try to remove the hose just yet.
19. Using the E12 Torx socket with the 3/8 drive ratchet and extension bar, remove the 2 aluminum bolts in view that secure the pump to the engine crank case.





20. Detach the pump electrical harness located at the topside of the pump near the third aluminum bolt by pulling it away from the spring clip.



21. Remove the third bolt by connecting the 3/8 universal to the tool setup in step 19 and reach up over the curvature of pump body. You can angle your head from the front looking aft so that you can actually see the bolt head just beyond the pump harness clip at the top. Feel the socket grip the bolt, hold the extension bar steady in place and begin turning slowly.
22. Lower the pump slowly allowing hose number 5 to naturally separate from the pump. Aha! It’s out!

New Water Pump and Thermostat Install

Note: The install procedure is basically the reverse of removal. Of course the same tool setup applies. Be careful not to overtighten the aluminum bolts as they may break off. BMW specified torque is 10Nm (88.5 in-lbs, 7.37 ft-lbs) or just turn the bolts until they begin to grab and then tighten another quarter turn.

23. Remove pump from bag. Remove the discharge orifice seal cap but leave the suction orifice seal cap in tact.
24. Pry the wire harness clip off the old pump using a screwdriver and fit it on to the new pump.
25. Raise the pump into position and attach hose number 5. Ensure that the hose clamp is in position but do not tighten.
26. Loosely fasten the pump bottom using 2 of the 3 new aluminum bolts.



27. Attach the top bolt and tighten.
28. Now attach the pump wire harness to the clip on the pump.
29. Tighten down the bottom bolts.



30. Tighten the hose clamp from step 25.
31. Using the reverse of step 16 to move the thermostat into place, orient the thermostat so that the barbed type hose flanges go in first. Visualizing the orientation of the installed unit helps.



32. Install and tighten the two steel mounting bolts for the thermostat.
33. Install the remaining thermostat hoses. Ensure that the two rigid plastic types are pushed in all the way. Return their spring clips to the locked position and verify lock by pulling back and forth on the connection.
34. Install the u-shaped water pump/thermostat hose and tighten the clamps.



35. Connect the water pump and thermostat electrical connectors. All connected!



Note: The next few steps are needed to safely lower the front end in preparation for system venting and still have fairly easy access to the hoses in the event of a leak.

36. Loosely attach the sway bar back into place using the 4 nuts.
37. Move the power steering hose loop into position, temporarily tying it up into place using wire. Ensure that it is raised so as not to droop. Keep the wire clear of any moving parts.
38. Leave off the aluminum splash guard support brackets for now.
39. Have your BMW brand coolant/de-ionized water blend mixed and ready.



40. Open the coolant reservoir cap make sure the bleed screw is loosened. Begin slowly pouring the new coolant. Air will escape through the bleeder. Continue filling until the floating level indicator rises up out of the reservoir. See the diagram on the cap for min and max fill levels. The indicator can stick at times so just tap it with a clean screw driver to make it float. The system should take close to one and a half gallons.
41. Replace the coolant cap and tighten down. Tighten the bleed screw.
42. Making sure that the area under and around the car is clear, start the vehicle, back it down the ramps and immediately turn off the ignition. Residual air in the system will need to be purged and running the engine for long periods of time in this condition could cause overheating, ultimately damaging your engine.

Venting Air from the System

Note: Make sure you have a watch or timer handy for this next part. Step 45 activates the water pump at which time you will need to set the timer for 12 minutes to allow the coolant to cycle around the system. The water pump will cycle on and off during this time and stop around the 12 minute mark. Allow the pump to cycle for the full 12 minutes. Hooking up a second battery beforehand will help save the car battery from running down. (See Connecting Jumper Cables under the Giving and Receiving Assistance section of the Owner's Manual.

43. Insert the key FOB into the ignition and without stepping on the brake, press Start.
44. With the climate control now activated, adjust the heat to the highest setting (both driver and passenger) and set the fan to low.
45. Now hold down the gas pedal for ten seconds and release. Start your timer now.
46. After the 12 minutes, take the key FOB out, open the reservoir cap, check the level indicator and top up the coolant if necessary.
47. Replace the coolant cap and tighten.
48. Start the engine and check the underside of the vehicle for leaks.
49. It’s time to button everything up underneath if no leaks are visible.
50. Drive the car up onto the ramps again, re-fasten the power steering hose loop to the steering rack (It’s tricky getting the bolt started and then use the 10mm box end wrench to finish), tighten down the sway bar bushing mount nuts to 16 ft-lbs, re-attach the two aluminum splashguard support brackets and replace the splash guard. 50 steps is enough! You’re done.

Related Bav Auto videos: Note - They remove the pump before the thermostat.



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  #1  
By marcus321 on 12-24-2012, 01:27 AM
Very impressive and detailed writeup! How long would you say an average Joe home mechanic would take to complete this diy
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  #2  
By Built My Way on 12-24-2012, 06:13 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marcus321 View Post
Very impressive and detailed writeup! How long would you say an average Joe home mechanic would take to complete this diy
Hey, thanks! It took me around 7 hours but there are always things to work out along the way with jobs like this. Also I tend to be a bit overly careful when I work on my car. But I would think maybe 4 to 5 hours tops. I'm still trying to iron out those pics that ended up sideways. Photobucket is not co-operating.
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  #3  
By Sethro on 12-26-2012, 10:00 AM
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Sweet right up, I just got all the parts to do this. I will be attacking this soon

Thanks
Sethro
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  #4  
By Cage26 on 12-31-2012, 08:28 PM
Just knocked this out. I think I drank a little bit of coolant too. Not fun
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  #5  
By stressdoc on 01-03-2013, 11:29 AM
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Thanks for the DIY

Nice job with this! If I had a heated garage... Instead I am forking over 1k + to get pump and oil filter gasket replaced...
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  #6  
By Built My Way on 01-04-2013, 04:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stressdoc View Post
Nice job with this! If I had a heated garage... Instead I am forking over 1k + to get pump and oil filter gasket replaced...
That's too bad. Why can't these problems happen when it's nice outside? I don't have a garage but I was lucky to get mine in before the first heavy snowfall.
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  #7  
By tcw on 01-11-2013, 04:53 PM
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Awesome DIY! I will be doing this this weekend as preventative maintenance at 60k miles. It there a good bleed spot on a manual that you know of? I am sure there is something on the bottom of the radiator if nothing else.
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  #8  
By NGEE on 01-11-2013, 08:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tcw View Post
Awesome DIY! I will be doing this this weekend as preventative maintenance at 60k miles. It there a good bleed spot on a manual that you know of? I am sure there is something on the bottom of the radiator if nothing else.
What'd you pay for your parts? Dealer hurt the old wallet...

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  #9  
By tcw on 01-11-2013, 10:23 PM
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It looks like you ordered the same bolts as me but the same waterpump as the OP, make sure you have the correct bolts for your application.


http://www.fcpimport.com/

================================================== ==========
Order Summary
================================================== ==========
11510392553 BMW Water Pump Set Screws Genuine BMW - 11510392553 (1) @ $8.75 = $8.75
11517588885 BMW Electric Water Pump - VDO (OEM) 11517588885 (1) @ $399.95 = $399.95
11537549476 BMW Thermostat - Behr 11537549476 (1) @ $74.99 = $74.99
82141467704 BMW Coolant/Antifreeze - Genuine BMW 82141467704 (1) @ $24.55 = $24.55
================================================== ==========
Subtotal: $508.24
Promotion (5% Off - Limited Time Only): -$25.41
Shipping: $0.00
Order Total: $482.83
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  #10  
By NGEE on 01-11-2013, 10:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tcw View Post
It looks like you ordered the same bolts as me but the same waterpump as the OP, make sure you have the correct bolts for your application.
Dude, you may have just saved me a ton of frustration. These new bolts are 32mm. Will call the dealer tomorrow and get the story straight.
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  #11  
By Built My Way on 01-12-2013, 06:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tcw View Post
Awesome DIY! I will be doing this this weekend as preventative maintenance at 60k miles. It there a good bleed spot on a manual that you know of? I am sure there is something on the bottom of the radiator if nothing else.
For a manual tranny, looks like you'll have to remove the intercooler to get to the drain screws (I think there are two) on the underside of the radiator. FYI, the first video in this link shows how to remove the intercooler.

http://www.1addicts.com/forums/showthread.php?t=563071
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  #12  
By Built My Way on 01-12-2013, 07:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edrive90 View Post
Dude, you may have just saved me a ton of frustration. These new bolts are 32mm. Will call the dealer tomorrow and get the story straight.
I think this is common. There are a couple of posts out there of people complaining about the top bolt bottoming out and someone actually leaving the top bolt off completely. Not good!
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  #13  
By NGEE on 01-12-2013, 09:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Built My Way View Post
I think this is common. There are a couple of posts out there of people complaining about the top bolt bottoming out and someone actually leaving the top bolt off completely. Not good!
Don't I feel stupid. I paid double the price to get the parts at the dealer because I thought I'd be assured of getting the right stuff. Thanks to TCW for the tip. It's still a PITA to drive back to the dealer, but at least I don't have to do it covered in grease and mad as heII!
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  #14  
By NGEE on 01-12-2013, 09:14 PM
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I just finished this job - took me all day. Had to start with a trip back to the dealer to get the RIGHT parts . Then I couldn't find low-profile ramps anywhere in the area, so I had to make my own.



To say the space is tight is a vast understatement. After attaching the new water pump it occurred to me that it may have been easier to pre-position the thermostat in it's general area first, rather than try to wrestle it up through that tight space between the fan shroud and the frame. Anyone ever tried that before? At any rate, I took a slight detour from the OP's directions in order to get the new thermostat into place:



Many thanks to the OP for the excellent tutorial. And a HUGE, HUGE thanks to TCW for COMPLETELY saving my weekend . If he hadn't noticed my part numbers were wrong, I wouldn't have realized I had the wrong bolts until after the dealer's parts department had closed for the day, and they don't re-open until Monday.

So the car is still on ramps because I've got to replace the oil filter housing gasket tomorrow, so can't refill the coolant until that's done. But for now, I have a sixtel of Firestone Walker Double Jack that I tapped last night, and it's calling my name....

edit: One last thought. It seems to me that this job goes hand-in-hand with the replacement of the oil filter housing gasket. If you do this job and find little black bits of rubber in your drained coolant, then replace the gasket. I think that the failure of the OFH gasket is at least partly responsible for all these water pump failures. See my DIY for the OFH gasket replacement: http://www.e90post.com/forums/showthread.php?t=791674
Last edited by NGEE; 01-21-2013 at 04:07 PM.
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  #15  
By Sethro on 01-16-2013, 09:47 PM
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wow, cant thank you enough, I am so glad you edited the first post with the correct part #'s for the bolts, I had the wrong ones.
I will be attacking this this weekend pending my bolts getting here on time.

Thanks
Seth
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  #16  
By Built My Way on 01-21-2013, 10:42 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sethro View Post
wow, cant thank you enough, I am so glad you edited the first post with the correct part #'s for the bolts, I had the wrong ones.
I will be attacking this this weekend pending my bolts getting here on time.

Thanks
Seth
I hope it went well for you. Sorry about the bolts. I had them written down on a separate piece of paper and they were missed first time around.
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  #17  
By Sethro on 01-21-2013, 12:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Built My Way View Post
I hope it went well for you. Sorry about the bolts. I had them written down on a separate piece of paper and they were missed first time around.
I just completed the water pump thermostat job this weekend, was not that bad of a job, I now have piece of mind that it will not fail and leave me stranded

Sethro
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  #18  
By Sethro on 01-29-2013, 09:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Built My Way View Post
I hope it went well for you. Sorry about the bolts. I had them written down on a separate piece of paper and they were missed first time around.
Don't be sorry, I am so glad you took the time to do this DIY, this write up made it much easier for me , it really was not that bad of a job, I have done much worse.
Thanks
Seth
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  #19  
By TheSubmariner on 02-01-2013, 09:57 PM
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Just curious how much labor or hours an Indy might charge if I purchased the parts and had them do it. I have a garage space problem to tackle something like this on my own...
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  #20  
By Built My Way on 02-02-2013, 08:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheSubmariner View Post
Just curious how much labor or hours an Indy might charge if I purchased the parts and had them do it. I have a garage space problem to tackle something like this on my own...
Waterpump, thermostat, new bolts and antifreeze cost me $580+tax. A quick search tells me that an Indy shop could charge $1000 parts & labor. $1400 at a dealer.
Also, you don't need a whole lot of space and you don't have to be inside to do the work yourself, weather permitting.
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  #21  
By robbie211 on 02-05-2013, 06:32 PM
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I'm in the process of changing out both waterpump and thermostat. I'm having trouble reaching the 3rd bolt for the waterpump. Thanks for the DIY it has come in handyl!
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