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      07-06-2009, 12:05 PM   #1
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Bridgestone 3G RFT's -- New generation run-flat tires addresses RFT complaints

New generation Bridgestone run-flat tires addresses RFT complaints?

BMW owners worldwide have lamented the switch of the BMW lineup to run-flat tires from the factory (in lieu of providing a spare tire). Many have complained of the RFT's ride harshness, noisiness, high cost and difficulty of patching.

Bridgestone, however, has come out with its latest generation RFTs, calling the 3rd generation run-flat tires the "3G RFT." The tire company recently utilized a fleet of BMWs in Italy to demonstrate the improvements made to the latest generation run-flat tires. Would these new RFTs diminish or completely eliminate the biggest complaints against run flat tires in general? Read Autoblog's report from the demonstration event to find out:

Quote:
Air-filled vehicle tires, or "pneumatic tires" as they are more properly called, were invented in 1846 by Robert Thomson. The European inventor wrapped an elastic belt of rubberized canvas with an outer casing of leather for protection around a wheel and filled it with air. Patented in France, his so-called "Aerial Wheels" were fitted to horse-drawn carriages to improve the ride. Unfortunately, Thompson's wheels were ahead of their time. The technology to build a durable and affordable pneumatic tire had yet to evolve.

It took but another 50 years for the invention of Bartlett Clincher's rims, Schrader's valves, beaded edges, and corded tires to make the original pneumatic tire invention a commercial success. In 1904, Firestone started producing corded reinforced pneumatic tires. Two years later, they were chosen by Henry Ford to be OEM tires on the Model T.



The basic design of a tire-a flexible sealed vessel to hold pressurized air-has changed very little in the past century with the exception of belt construction and tire compounds. Furthermore, the tire's Achilles Heel remains the same; any compromise of the outer casing allows the pressure to escape resulting in a vehicle-crippling flat tire (according to Bridgestone, a staggering 60,000 motorists in the United States are afflicted by a punctured tire each day).

The concept of a tire that can still be "driven on" after suffering a "flat tire" (a complete loss of pressure) has been tossed around for decades. Tire manufacturers have tried self-sealing tires (a layer of flexible sealant inside the tire clogs punctures), dual-lined tires (additional layers of material slow or delay air loss), auxiliary-supported tires (a rigid ring mounted on the wheel holds the tire up at zero pressure), and self-supporting tires (stiffer sidewalls sustain the weight of the vehicle after a pressure loss). To skirt the issue entirely, some manufacturers have even tested non-pneumatic tires that don't require any pressurized air at all.

The most common type of run-flat today is the self-supporting tire. Compared to a conventional tire, the construction of a self-supporting run-flat requires additional material thickness in the sidewalls to prevent the tire's collapse once it has lost pressure. It is this additional reinforcement that adds weight, reduces ride comfort, and increases rolling resistance (these characteristics are the kiss-of-death to performance).



While Bridgestone originally developed run-flat tires for physically disabled drivers, the company's first well-known application of "self-supporting" run-flat tire technology (SSR) debuted in the late-80's on Porsche's 959 supercar. The OEM-spec tires on the 200-plus mph Kevlar-bodied exotic were "Potenza RE71 N0" run-flats. Considered the company's first-generation run-flat (known as the "1G RFT"), the technology utilized Bridgestone's "Denloc" system. Technically ahead of its time, the Denloc system was based on a special wheel design that held the tire's bead in place after a loss of pressure. While the technology worked, the failure to use a standard mass-produced wheel prevented it from expanding to a broad consumer market.

Things changed in 2004 when Bridgestone introduced its second-generation run-flat technology (2G RFT). Significantly updated, the tires were designed to fit standardized wheels, thus releasing the need for expensive specialty rims. Lighter than their predecessors, and with improved sidewall-reinforced rubber, the 2G RFT became an OEM tire for many BMW, MINI, Toyota and Infiniti vehicles. The product line also expanded to high performance vehicles such as the Ferrari 612 Scaglietti and BMW Z8.

Consumers embraced the additional mobility and safety benefits of the 2G RFT, but they never warmed to the handling compromises as a result of the additional unsprung weight, the harsh ride (the sidewalls are a noticeable 15 percent harder than a conventional tire, says Bridgestone), or the expensive replacement cost (up to 30 percent higher, in some cases). Frustrated, many vehicle owners exchanged their run-flat tires with conventional tires even before it was time for their replacement.



Meanwhile back in the laboratory, Bridgestone engineers were hard at work developing the third-generation run-flat (3G RFT, above) designed to address these concerns head-on. Their research and prowess resulted in three new cutting-edge technologies:

* Unique ply construction: The reinforcing layers of a tire are called the "ply." Bridgestone developed a tire ply that uses the heat generated by a deflated tire to contract and curb deformation. In simple terms, the material in the new sidewalls automatically shrinks to abate damage from abrasion and heat. When the tire cools, the ply automatically returns to its original state.
* New rubber compounds: Laboratory-engineered rubber compounds, Bridgestone calls them "NanoPro-Tech," are also used in the sidewalls to limit heat. Conventional tire compounds warm through friction between the carbon and polymers (two common tire ingredients). By optimally distributing the polymers, friction and heat are minimized. Of course, this also reduces energy loss increasing fuel economy.
* Innovative heat control: Bridgestone developed so-called "cooling fin" technology for the new tire. Molded into the sidewall are small protrusions (think of them as miniature spoilers). While this seems rather rudimentary, they effectively disrupt the airflow at the surface to help radiate heat and cool the tire. Thermo-vision (heat sensing) photography of the "cooling fin" technology in action shows a dramatic improvement when compared to smooth sidewalls.


Bridgestone utilizes these technologies independently, or combined, based on the specific design parameters and size of each 3G RFT tire application. For example, the lower sidewalls of a sports car (e.g., BMW Z4) will unlikely receive cooling fin technology, but a higher-profile tire with more weight to bear (e.g., non-sport BMW X5) would have the cooling fins. Regardless of the formula, Bridgestone says all of its new 3G RFT tires are designed to operate safely with zero pressure for up to 80 kilometers (about 50 miles). But, more on that a bit later...

Leaving the technical jargon in the classroom, Bridgestone encouraged us to try its new third-generation run-flat (3G RFT) from behind the wheel. Lacking sensitive test equipment to capture objective differences between the 2G and 3G tires, we were understandably apprehensive approaching this tire "comparison." After all, how does one subjectively "feel" through fast-food sculpted posteriors the subtle nuances in ride quality that reportedly differentiate the two generations of run-flat tires? The answer was Bridgestone's European Proving Grounds in Italy.



The European Proving Ground (EUPG) is to a tire enthusiast what an unattended pharmacy cabinet would be to a drug addict – pure bliss. Located 50 km (about 30 miles) south of Rome, the purpose-built facility is a sprawling high-security testing ground for the latest in Bridgestone tire technology. Set within the outer perimeter gates of the four-year-old complex is a glass-smooth four-lane oval nearly 2.5-miles in length with 35-degree banking in each corner. Inside the oval, and connected for high-speed runs off the main track, is a massive skidpad (an amazing 22 acres of smooth concrete!), two independent short road courses, a wet handling course, and several side-by-side lengths of paved straight-aways designed to mimic various smooth and rough pavement surfaces found around the world. The whole package is wrapped in neatly manicured grounds sprawling with blooming Italian wildflowers.

Strapped in near identical late-model BMW 5 Series vehicles, Bridgestone offered us the opportunity to drive three different variants of its high-performance RE050A tire back-to-back: Conventional, 2G RFT, and 3G RFT.

We drove the conventional RE050A first. A high-performance tire fitted to such cars as the Nissan 370Z and Lexus IS-F, the standard rubber was comfortable on the smooth sections. The course/rough pavements didn't provide much of a challenge either as the compliant sidewalls absorbed the abuse without drama. We've put thousands of miles on these high-rated tires in the real world with few complaints.

Next, we tried a set of RE050A "2G" run-flats, the OEM application found on thousands of late-model BMW and MINI models. Owners appreciate the run-flat technology, but have raised issues with ride quality initiated by the stiff sidewalls and additional mass rotating on each wheel. While they were comfortable on the smooth sections, the compromises of the 2G run-flats were immediately evident when we entered the first sections of rough pavement. What had been dampened by shock-absorbing sidewalls on the standard tires was now transferred into the cabin in the form of sharp, and rather uncomfortable, impacts. This test reinforced what many owners have expressed and what we have personally experienced.



The final run through the test course was done with the all-new RE050A "3G" run-flats. Eureka! Surprising even the skeptics among us, the third-generation tires were nearly imperceptible in ride quality from the standard tires (non run-flat) we had driven on merely minutes earlier. The ride was very comfortable. According to Bridgestone, test instruments reveal that the slight difference in ride quality was a near-imperceptible 5 percent change in harshness.

Bridgestone also allowed us to drive a 3G RFT technology-equipped vehicle with a flat tire through a simulated slalom course. The car handled sloppy, and the tire howled when pressed, but it was entirely controllable. Afterwards, the tire wasn't even very hot to the touch.



Driving their message even further, we were shuttled by bus out into the Italian countryside for some real-world observations. Another fleet of late-model BMW 5 Series vehicles were fitted with 2G RFT and 3G RFT tires for back-to-back comparisons. Bridgestone held us close (with pace cars front and rear) as we toured 2-lane roads across farms and into the surrounding hills. The roads were in fairly lousy condition, but they again demonstrated the newfound compliance one can expect with the third-generation run-flat.

While Bridgestone states that all of its new 3G RFT tires are designed to operate safely with zero pressure for up to 80 kilometers (about 50 miles), the reality is that a run-flat tire is designed to get you safely off the road and out of harm's way to where the tire may be safely serviced or replaced. In truth, a virtual clock starts ticking the moment a RFT loses pressure (the frictional stress and heat literally "cook" the service life out of the rubber compounds). Consequently, high vehicle loads, high ambient temperatures, and high speeds accelerate the clock, while light loads and cold temperatures slow it (when we experience a loss of pressure with a run-flat, we immediately pull over safely in the hope that the tire may be properly repaired before it is destroyed by driving on the vehicle). Of course, run-flat tires should never be fitted to a vehicle without a tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS).



The track sessions and test drives made it clear that Bridgestone has eliminated the biggest objection to run-flat tires – abusive ride quality. We never had an opportunity to push the performance envelope of the tire, but Bridgestone says the tread compound of the RE050A 3G RFT is identical to that on the conventional tire, so the grip levels should be very high. Lastly, the cost of RFT technology has come down a bit. While pricing has not been announced as of yet, Bridgestone expects the 3G RFT to carry a 20-percent price premium over the equivalent conventional tire, a small price to pay from a safety aspect.

Bridgestone's third-generation run-flat technology also seems to have clearly addressed the issue of comfort that plagued its predecessor. Moreover, the new "NanoPro-Tech" polymers and "Cooling Fin" technologies will undoubtedly allow the company to expand the fitments and marketability of the new 3G RFT product line, likely helping to bring the cost down even further.



While the first two iterations of zero-pressure tires from Bridgestone delivered the safety and mobility they promised, their negatives frequently outweighed the benefits... particularly in performance applications. Bridgestone's third-generation run-flat tires seem to represent a solution with far fewer compromises. It is a path we are finally willing to take. -- http://www.autoblog.com/2009/07/06/r...ck-out-of-run/
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      07-06-2009, 12:15 PM   #2
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Looks promising. Nice write-up by Autoblog.
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      07-06-2009, 12:26 PM   #3
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How much will it cost???
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      07-06-2009, 12:26 PM   #4
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Sounds Promising, i wouldn't mind some when i need new tires.
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      07-06-2009, 12:30 PM   #5
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Sounds Promising, i wouldn't mind some when i need new tires.
Not if they're gonna cost 500-600 USD each...
then i'll rather get some Michelin PS2s....
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      07-06-2009, 12:43 PM   #6
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3rd Generation Bridgestone RFTs

They are apparently only 5% stiffer than conventional tyres (while the 2G runflats, which are fitted to most BMWs, are 15% stiffer).

I was wondering if this new development would lead people to stick with runflats rather than switching to conventional tyres?

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      07-06-2009, 12:44 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by E90SLAM View Post
How much will it cost???
FTA:
"Lastly, the cost of RFT technology has come down a bit. While pricing has not been announced as of yet, Bridgestone expects the 3G RFT to carry a 20-percent price premium over the equivalent conventional tire, a small price to pay from a safety aspect."
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      07-06-2009, 12:47 PM   #8
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so inbetween... the current tires and RFTs.

RFT F 300ea
RFT R 400ea

regular F 180ea
regular R 200ea

estimated price...
3G F 245ea.
3G R 300ea.

not bad I'll bite

ppp
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      07-06-2009, 12:48 PM   #9
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I'd give them another chance once I see some what kind of wear other owners are getting with them.

The cost per mile vs performance ratio on the runflats is the biggest reason I don't use them. The wear out much too quickly for a tire that costs so much yet performs like much cheaper traditional sport tire.
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      07-06-2009, 12:51 PM   #10
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the truth is written in here about RFT's and it's this:

you're supposed to pull over immediately and change or fix the tire rather than riding on it...they are really only designed to help you steer after a catastrophic loss of pressure at high speed.
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      07-06-2009, 12:54 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ellipsis212 View Post
the truth is written in here about RFT's and it's this:

you're supposed to pull over immediately and change or fix the tire rather than riding on it...they are really only designed to help you steer after a catastrophic loss of pressure at high speed.
i disagree.

they are designed to allow you to drive a resonable distance to get the car tire fixed. They are designed to allow you to safely navigate a busy highway and find a safe garage/tire shop to fix immediately following the puncture.

they arent designed to drive on for days or weeks .

ppp
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      07-06-2009, 12:57 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Potty_Pants View Post
they are designed to allow you to drive a resonable distance to get the car tire fixed. They are designed to allow you to safely navigate a busy highway and find a safe garage/tire shop to fix immediately following the puncture.
The only problem with this is that I have never heard of any shop fixing a punctured RFT - they always say you have to replace it. I thought I remembered reading that the shops didn't want the liability because they couldn't tell how far the car had been driven on a flat.
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      07-06-2009, 12:58 PM   #13
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I have Pirelli winter rfts and they did everything that Bridgestone claims this 3rd gen tire does. The car lost the sharpness of impacts and the ride quality greatly improved. I always said that it was Bridgestone's rft tech that was flawed. Not the concept.

That being said. I have conventional PS2s on my car right now and they are far more comfortible than either tire.
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      07-06-2009, 12:58 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Potty_Pants View Post
i disagree.

they are designed to allow you to drive a resonable distance to get the car tire fixed. They are designed to allow you to safely navigate a busy highway and find a safe garage/tire shop to fix immediately following the puncture.

they arent designed to drive on for days or weeks .

ppp
FTA:

"While Bridgestone states that all of its new 3G RFT tires are designed to operate safely with zero pressure for up to 80 kilometers (about 50 miles), the reality is that a run-flat tire is designed to get you safely off the road and out of harm's way to where the tire may be safely serviced or replaced. In truth, a virtual clock starts ticking the moment a RFT loses pressure (the frictional stress and heat literally "cook" the service life out of the rubber compounds). Consequently, high vehicle loads, high ambient temperatures, and high speeds accelerate the clock, while light loads and cold temperatures slow it (when we experience a loss of pressure with a run-flat, we immediately pull over safely in the hope that the tire may be properly repaired before it is destroyed by driving on the vehicle). Of course, run-flat tires should never be fitted to a vehicle without a tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS)."
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      07-06-2009, 01:04 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Potty_Pants View Post
so inbetween... the current tires and RFTs.

RFT F 300ea
RFT R 400ea

regular F 180ea
regular R 200ea

estimated price...
3G F 245ea.
3G R 300ea.

not bad I'll bite

ppp
i dont know what price you used for the conventional tire price....but thats some funky math for a 20% price increase
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      07-06-2009, 01:10 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Potty_Pants View Post
i disagree.

they are designed to allow you to drive a resonable distance to get the car tire fixed. They are designed to allow you to safely navigate a busy highway and find a safe garage/tire shop to fix immediately following the puncture.

they arent designed to drive on for days or weeks .

ppp

i think that's really a secondary benefit that you can employ at risk of destroying the tire permanently.
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      07-06-2009, 01:11 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twinturboa51 View Post
i dont know what price you used for the conventional tire price....but thats some funky math for a 20% price increase
+1

From Tirerack:
Bridgestone Potenza RE050A (non RFT)
$268 front (19'', 235)
$287 rear (19'', 265)

New 3G RFTs:
$321 front
$344 rear
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      07-06-2009, 01:33 PM   #18
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These sound interesting, but a true test for those of us with the mod bug will be how well do they stick? I really do like the implied safety that the RFT's provide, but when pushed my OEM (i guess 2g RFT's) turn over quicker than a hooker eager to eat the pillow...where as you get no traction from the rear!

Anyways, I hope they addressed the harse ride (the tires not the hooker) and the stickiness of the TIRE. I would love for someone to get these on a car and do some real world testing, some runs at the drag strip and some closed course runs. If the reviews would come in very favorably to non-RFT's then I would be happy to purchase these as replacement tires or at least consider them.
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      07-06-2009, 02:21 PM   #19
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Run flat technology makes AT&T wireless seem like good service. Honestly companies should not do product testing on consumers specially with an inferior product with such high prices.
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      07-06-2009, 02:52 PM   #20
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as much as i don't care for the RFTs....when driving home one xmas in my wifes 325, we hit a HUGE pothole. pressure sensor went off immediately. there was a 3" x 3' tear in the side wall... i was able to safely drive home 30 miles. i was pretty impressed, and happy her car had them.
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      07-06-2009, 03:12 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Strongmad View Post
FTA:
"Lastly, the cost of RFT technology has come down a bit. While pricing has not been announced as of yet, Bridgestone expects the 3G RFT to carry a 20-percent price premium over the equivalent conventional tire, a small price to pay from a safety aspect."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Potty_Pants View Post
so inbetween... the current tires and RFTs.

RFT F 300ea
RFT R 400ea

regular F 180ea
regular R 200ea

estimated price...
3G F 245ea.
3G R 300ea.

not bad I'll bite

ppp
if the performance and ride comfort is up to par with conventional performance tires, and able to patch it on conventional tire shops.....its a very small price to pay for lots of safety...
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      07-06-2009, 03:14 PM   #22
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The only problem with this is that I have never heard of any shop fixing a punctured RFT - they always say you have to replace it. I thought I remembered reading that the shops didn't want the liability because they couldn't tell how far the car had been driven on a flat.
+1

the enforced sidewall could no longer handle zero pressure again since its was holding all the loads just on the sidewall for a certain distance....so the RFTs might not up to task on the next puncture....and just fail and run on rims only....
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