Tirerack
Use the following links to go directly to useful tirerack winter items: Tirerack Winter Tires. Gary's Winter Tire FAQ.
Using the links directly supports E90Post with tirerack sales commision!

  E90Post
 


TireRack

   PLEASE HELP SUPPORT E90POST BY DOING YOUR TIRERACK SHOPPING FROM THIS BANNER, THANKS!
 
BMW 3-Series (E90 E92) Forum > E90 / E92 / E93 3-series Technical Forums > Wheels and Tires Forum Sponsored by The Tire Rack > Another Question About Run-flat Tires



Wheels and Tires forum Sponsored by The Tire Rack
Please help to directly support e90post by doing your tirerack shopping from the above link. For every sale made through the link, e90post gets sponsor support to keep the site alive. Disclaimer

Wheel offset calculator courtesy of BimmerPost.com. You may use this calculator to calculate what tire sizes you might need if you upgrade your tires, or what wheel sizes/offsets are compatible with your car.
    Current Wheel Width  inches             Current Wheel Offset  mm.
         New Wheel Width  inches                  New Wheel Offset  mm.
 
TIRE WIDTH
/
ASPECT RATIO
- WHEEL DIAMETER
ORIGINAL TIRES
/
NEW TIRES
/
Based on your stock wheel setup, your new wheel will have:
Original Tires Diameter (in.)
      New Tires Diameter (in.)
  Difference in diameter (in.)
           Percent Difference %
                     
Speedo @60mph will read: mph
Collapse/Expand the BimmerPost Wheel and Tire calculator
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
      09-01-2005, 11:21 AM   #1
xyz123
Private First Class
 
Drives: E90 325i
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Toronto

Posts: 137
iTrader: (0)

Another Question About Run-flat Tires

So far, the only things I have heard about run-flat tires is that you can drive on them for a while after a flat but that they are heavy, stiff and expensive. From this, I would think that it is safe to assume that the casing construction is a lot different from non-runflat tires. I am curious to know whether this difference has resulted in any difference in puncture resistance (through the tread) for better or worse than non-runflats. I am only guessing but I would think that tread life is more or less independent of casing design and construction so I wouldn’t expect much if any difference there. Anybody hear anything about puncture resistance?

Thanks, my apologies if this has already been answered in this forum and I missed it.
xyz123 is offline  
0
Reply With Quote
      09-01-2005, 11:23 AM   #2
- Paul -
Major General
 
- Paul -'s Avatar
 
Drives: see above.
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Yorkshire, UK

Posts: 7,266
iTrader: (5)

Garage List
2005 320D SE  [5.00]
2005 645  [4.50]
The sidewalls are thicker - not the tread (as far as I'm aware) so can't see much more puncture resistance unless the offending item enters via the sidewall.
- Paul - is offline   England
0
Reply With Quote
      09-01-2005, 12:58 PM   #3
E90Fleet
Major General
 
Drives: BMW
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: South Africa

Posts: 8,047
iTrader: (0)

The tread is the same as normal tires, so puncture resistance is the same.

For interest:
A friend drove over a 100miles on his runflats with a 2" hole in his tire after hitting a rock or something on the highway and he felt no ill effects
E90Fleet is offline   South Africa
0
Reply With Quote
      09-01-2005, 02:42 PM   #4
xyz123
Private First Class
 
Drives: E90 325i
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Toronto

Posts: 137
iTrader: (0)

Quote:
Originally Posted by E90Fleet
The tread is the same as normal tires, so puncture resistance is the same.

For interest:
A friend drove over a 100miles on his runflats with a 2" hole in his tire after hitting a rock or something on the highway and he felt no ill effects
Thanks, I am a bit surprised that puncture resistance is entirely a function of the tread. Besides the tread, the puncture resistant belt(s), if any, underneath the tread are probably also the same, runflat vs non-runflat, but I wondered if the cross plies are different in a way that affects resistance to penetration. These radial plies would seem to be a lot stiffer and heavier than on non-runflats, judging by how the sidewalls did their job in your example. But I suppose that once a foreign object penetrates the circumferential belt, the cross plies offer little resistance, whatever their other characteristic are.
xyz123 is offline  
0
Reply With Quote
      09-01-2005, 06:30 PM   #5
rob944s2
New Member
 
Drives: E90 325i Jet Black
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Las Vegas

Posts: 9
iTrader: (0)

I hit a pothole in my E90 after havng it one month, middle of the desert. Split the sidewalls on two tires (left side) and drove it 120+ miles home on the run flats @ 50 mph.

Damage report: Needed two new wheels / tires. New front strut and strut plate. Alignment.

Rob
rob944s2 is offline  
0
Reply With Quote
      09-11-2005, 01:27 AM   #6
BMW Lawman
Supreme Commander of Allied Forces
 
BMW Lawman's Avatar
 
Drives: 2012 335i Sport
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Oregon

Posts: 271
iTrader: (0)

Garage List
Good Lord.....how big was that pothole.....or was it the Meteor Crater in Arizona?
BMW Lawman is offline   United_States
0
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:49 PM.




e90post
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
1Addicts.com, BIMMERPOST.com, E90Post.com, F30Post.com, M3Post.com, ZPost.com, 5Post.com, 6Post.com, 7Post.com, XBimmers.com logo and trademark are properties of BIMMERPOST