E90Post
 


TNT Racewerks
 
BMW 3-Series (E90 E92) Forum > E90 / E92 / E93 3-series Technical Forums > Suspension | Brakes | Chassis > Powerflex subframe bushing inserts (and Hotchkis sway bar) review and info.



Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
      06-11-2011, 04:48 AM   #1
Chowbow
pew pew
 
Drives: 三三五i
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: CA

Posts: 6,707
iTrader: (5)

Powerflex subframe bushing inserts (and Hotchkis sway bar) review and info.

Today I received the Powerflex polyurethane subframe bushing inserts, and thought I'd post some notes from my install and some initial impressions. The installation requires lowering the rear subframe of the car, and I installed a Hotchkis 16mm rear sway bar at the same time.

The Powerflex poly subframe bushing inserts are for the rear subframe of the E9x and E82s - non M only. Basically, they are polyurethane chunks that take up the open air space that's present in the bushings, which reduces the amount of flex when the suspension gets loaded from turning, accelerating, and braking. The M cars have a pretty solid rubber bushing already and these do not apply to those cars (and they are probably a better choice for some people rather than putting these in - read on for more).

The kit comes with a total of 8 inserts and some grease. There are 4 subframe bushings on our cars, and each bushing has 2 inserts - one that slides in from the top of the bushing, and another that slides in from the bottom of the bushing. The "front" 2 bushings are not the same as the "rear" 2 bushings. The inserts themselves are surprisingly pliable. My previous experiences with polyurethane bushings are that they are stiff and hard chunks, and have very little flexibility. However, these inserts are not super stiff and actually seem a bit flimsy. They are difficult to compress though (like squeeze one of the feet that sticks out, and you can't compress the material too much). As these are made to simply take up air space, I'm thinking they can be made from a lower durometer material.

Here's a picture of a pair of the rear bushing inserts. The insert on the left slides in from the bottom, the insert on the right goes in from the top.


And here are the front inserts. The left insert goes on top, right insert goes on the bottom.


2 packs of grease are included. It's some sort of a copper grease which seems to me like it's copper anti-seize of sorts. 2 packs is not enough IMO. It was enough to put a light coating on each of the 8 inserts. If you're buying these inserts, buy another 6 packs of grease from Powerflex at $2 each. This is not an install you want to repeat for squeaks. Coat the living crap out of the inserts with grease. I did not use marine grease on the areas that touch the stock rubber bushings, as I'm not sure if the marine grease degrades it. I used marine grease on the areas which only contact metal though.

I won't go too much about the Hotchkis rear sway bar as this thread is really more about the bushing inserts. I will say that I chose this 16mm bar because it's not drastically thicker than stock, and I was worried the 20mm M3 bar would be too snappy with the stock front sway bar. Additionally, the Hotchkis comes with seriously beefy adjustable endlinks with spherical bearings, and poly bushings that have zerk fittings (which I doubt are accessible though). I think they are Hotchkis swaybar bushings that fit tons of cars and look somewhat generic. One thing I have to note: the swaybar did NOT come with a polyurethane grease which is surprising, but it came with threadlock for some bolts. WTF? The grease for polyurethane bushings are hard to find and it's weird it didn't come with any. I used some marine grease as a substitute per the suggestion of a bunch of E36 and E46 folks.

Hotchkis adjustable endlink compared to stock:


Hotchkis poly bushing with zerk fitting compared to stock:



Onto the install. It wasn't as bad as I thought it would be. I looked at some rear swaybar DIYs and I was a little skeptical lowering the subframe in my garage but it ended up going well. I spent a lot more time working to get the swaybar installed, than getting the bushing inserts installed.

To begin, I put the front wheels on Rhino Ramps. This gave me maximum clearance, and wouldn't put the car at a crazy angle with the rear also off the ground. Then I jacked up the rear and put the frame on jack stands. Make sure the car is stable before proceeding! The car is pretty high off the ground so make sure your jack has plenty of reach to jack up and support the subframe. I'm going to guess those little aluminum lightweight jacks that are pretty popular will not suffice for this install. I supported the subframe by the pumpkin the entire time using a super long (and high) reach low profile jack.

If you're just installing the bushings inserts, you DO NOT have to disconnect the drive shaft, half shafts, control arms, brake lines, exhaust - none of that. You have to remove the little clips that hold the ABS sensor and brake pad sensor on each side for slack, and that's it. I ended up disconnecting the upper control arm only to get the swaybar out.

Here is what the rear suspension looked like before lowering the subframe. I disconnected the rear upper control arm so I could maneuver the swaybar out of the way. The swaybar endlink is disconnected (the new Hotchkis one is shown here, just pre-installed). And all the way to the right of the pic is the clip that I removed from the subframe that holds the ABS sensor wire.


These pictures should give you an idea of how much you have to lower the subframe in order to slip in the "top" inserts. The inserts are actually quite pliable and can bend quite easily so you can work them in even if you don't have the full amount of clearance.

The rear bushing's top insert. About 1.75" of clearance is required to put this in.


The front bushing's top insert. About 1" of clearance is required.


OK now you're finally ready to drop the rear subframe. First make sure you have an E18 external torx socket. I have a set of e-torx sockets that only went up to E16 and I wasted an hour sourcing an E18 socket. Support the pumpkin, and loosen the front subframe bolts. Take one of them all the way out just so you know how much of the bolt you can loosen before it comes off. Have them about halfway out. Then loosen the bolts holding up the rear of the subframe about 3/4 of the way out too. Lower the jack SLOWLY. Stop and check to make sure you're not stretching the brake lines. There's enough slack there, but double check.

When the subframe has dropped and is resting on the loosened bolts, jack it back up a tiny bit, and remove just 1 of the rear subframe bolts. I never had more than 1 bolt completely disconnected at any one time. You can now install your heavily greased inserts. Just push them into the stock bushing. Put the bolt back in and get a good amount of threads started, and repeat on the other side.

Here's a picture of the rear bushing, with the bolt removed. There's about 1.5" of clearance between frame and the top of the bushing. Plenty of space to put the top insert in.


The top and bottom inserts installed into the rear bushing. You can see the top of the insert has a blue grease, which is the marine grease I used in order to preserve the copper stuff from Powerflex. Marine grease was used on poly-to-metal mating surfaces.


Now onto the slighty more difficult front bushings. There is simply less space to put the top inserts in, the subframe doesn't lower as much on the front it seems. I used a pry bar to pry down the subframe a bit to get more clearance in order to slip the top insert in. It's not extremely difficult, and what helps is if you have the bolt for the opposing corner of the subframe tightened up a bit more. Eg. If you tighten the right rear bolt, the front left part of the subframe drops down more.

The front subframe inserts in place. Again, copper Powerflex grease on poly-to-rubber mating surfaces, marine grease on poly-to-metal mating surfaces.


Once you have the inserts in, jack the subframe back up, and torque each of the E18 bolts to 65ft/lbs. That's it!

Time wise, I spent about 7.5 hours on the whole thing by myself. However, that's with the swaybar installation which required removing more items, adjusting the endlinks, wrestling to get that freakin' bar in and out, etc. For JUST the bushing inserts, I think you can get it done in 4-5 hours. It really wasn't that bad. Heck you might spend 30 mins out of that time just greasing the inserts. Since you don't have to take apart all the components attached to the subframe to install these, it's quite easy.

Here's the way I see it. If you're going to DIY this - this mod is worthwhile. If you're paying someone, get the whole polyurethane bushing from Powerflex, or do the OEM M3 subframe bushings. No point paying someone $400 to install these inserts, when you can pay $600 to get the full bushing replaced. I think this is a good mod, but I don't think it's as good as doing an actual rear subframe bushing replacement and I certainly wouldn't have a shop put the inserts in to save a few bucks.

Update 1 - driving and autocross impressions (6/12/11):
On the street, the difference is not earth shattering. The ride is marginally worse, but nothing worth noting. In day to day normal driving there's little difference unless you are very attuned to any reduction in the inertia being thrown around from bumps in the road etc. I then took the car on some pretty twisty mountain roads and it's more dramatic here. You can feel the rear is more planted and left/right transitions definitely feel better with the reduced slop, and the shocks and springs get to work more efficiently since the subframe isn't bouncing around as much.

At the autocross though, the improvement from the inserts is much more evident with very abrupt left/right transitions and pushing it all the way. It's quite a big difference here and the weight of the whole car being thrown from one side to the other is more controlled. With the stock and kind of worn bushings, the whole body of the car gets thrown from the right side to the left, and it can move quite a bit in that transition. There was also a little bit of a "hammer" effect as the weight shifting from one side to the other is pretty uncontrolled with the stock bushings. With the amount of slop in the bushings, there's more distance for the body to be thrown around and on quick transitions it's caused snap oversteer in the past.

Check out this video BEFORE the inserts. At around 0:38, I lose the rear end on a left hand turn from an elevation change. The car oversteers and the rear end steps out to the right. Then, the rear snap oversteers the other way into a short drift around a right hand corner. That "snap" was not well controlled, and I probably could have corrected it better in the first place to avoid the complete slide that followed, but the weight being thrown around with all the slop in the bushings makes it difficult to control.



This is reduced quite a lot with the bushing inserts and the rear end didn't feel as snappy today. The rear still stepped out because of the swaybar I installed and I have to rework the rear shock settings to try and compensate for this - but that's a different story altogether.

If I were to do this again, I would be 50/50. If your car has tons of miles and the OEM bushings are likely pretty shot anyway, skip this and replace them with upgraded units. If you can't stand paying a shop the $600 or so required to install replacements, I think this is definitely the next best alternative to DIY. Heck, there are people who fill their bushings with that polyurethane injection stuff, or even that expandable foam stuff! Same concept here but I'm sure these will last quite a bit longer. At some point, the stock rubber bushings will be completely shot, and they will have to be replaced. At that time, I may go with the full polyurethane subframe bushing.

I will be to a track day in a month as well. I will report back.

And for the heck of it, one picture of the car all buttoned up.
__________________

CSL replicas are now CSL counterfeits. Jesus saves, like Valentine1.

Last edited by Chowbow; 06-12-2011 at 06:14 PM.
Chowbow is offline  
0
Reply With Quote
      06-11-2011, 10:05 AM   #2
chumley
Captain
 
chumley's Avatar
 
Drives: 2009 335
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Naples, FL

Posts: 707
iTrader: (1)

Great write up, thanks! Interested to hear your impressions after driving it for a while.

Did you buy them directly from Powerflex?
__________________


PROcede V5Rev3+Openflash stacked, PWM Meth, DCI, BMW PE, ETS FMIC, Koni's w/Swifts, Rogue, Powerflex, SWS8xi's, Alufelgen Hyperblacks, LUX V4
chumley is offline  
0
Reply With Quote
      06-11-2011, 04:22 PM   #3
zeenon53
Major
 
zeenon53's Avatar
 
Drives: BMW
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: obx

Posts: 1,067
iTrader: (3)

Very nice write up. I Know some people will just fill the mounts with urethane instead and wait for it to dry instead of buying replacement bushings or inserts.
zeenon53 is offline  
0
Reply With Quote
      06-12-2011, 06:15 PM   #4
Chowbow
pew pew
 
Drives: 三三五i
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: CA

Posts: 6,707
iTrader: (5)

Updated with some more driving impressions and an autocross today.
__________________

CSL replicas are now CSL counterfeits. Jesus saves, like Valentine1.
Chowbow is offline  
0
Reply With Quote
      09-21-2011, 03:57 PM   #5
tscdennab
Banned
 
Drives: BMW 335i
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Europe

Posts: 1,811
iTrader: (0)

Garage List
2008 BMW  [3.12]
I am thinking about this upgrade too (the Powerflex inserts). But are you 100% sure that you notice improvements ? It seems to me that there is too little polyurethane in the inserts to make a difference.
tscdennab is offline  
0
Reply With Quote
      09-21-2011, 05:11 PM   #6
Chowbow
pew pew
 
Drives: 三三五i
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: CA

Posts: 6,707
iTrader: (5)

There's definitely a difference, but I think if you're just daily driving the car and hanging out around town I doubt it'll be really noticeable. And if you're not going to DIY, just pay to get something beefier put in. You might also be able to DIY the actual bushing replacements from PowerFlex without removing the subframe. The front set of bushings come in 2 pieces, and you can probably fit the top piece in without removing the subframe.
__________________

CSL replicas are now CSL counterfeits. Jesus saves, like Valentine1.
Chowbow is offline  
0
Reply With Quote
      03-15-2012, 03:53 PM   #7
Chowbow
pew pew
 
Drives: 三三五i
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: CA

Posts: 6,707
iTrader: (5)

Just a quick update on something I noticed. Installing these inserts essentially puts a "spacer" between the subframe and the frame - as you can see in this picture (repeated from original post):



I just installed a Vanguard exhaust and the exhaust tips were hanging a little low. It's because one set of exhaust hangers attaches to the bottom of the subframe mount (which is now slightly lower with these inserts). To fix this I needed to get different exhaust hangers which were shorter to compensate.
__________________

CSL replicas are now CSL counterfeits. Jesus saves, like Valentine1.
Chowbow is offline  
0
Reply With Quote
      03-15-2012, 04:02 PM   #8
fromkrypton
Private
 
Drives: 2006 330i
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Candiac

Posts: 94
iTrader: (0)

Garage List
2006 330i  [0.00]
Thanks for the update. I am having my BMW dealership install these inserts tomorrow. I have a magnaflow catback installed. Were the exhaust hangers you use BMW parts? When I talk to my service advisor tomorrow I would like to tell him. Or would I be better off bringing it to a muffler place after the bushing insert install?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chowbow View Post
Just a quick update on something I noticed. Installing these inserts essentially puts a "spacer" between the subframe and the frame - as you can see in this picture (repeated from original post):



I just installed a Vanguard exhaust and the exhaust tips were hanging a little low. It's because one set of exhaust hangers attaches to the bottom of the subframe mount (which is now slightly lower with these inserts). To fix this I needed to get different exhaust hangers which were shorter to compensate.
fromkrypton is offline  
0
Reply With Quote
      03-15-2012, 04:09 PM   #9
Chowbow
pew pew
 
Drives: 三三五i
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: CA

Posts: 6,707
iTrader: (5)

I just went to a muffler shop and we looked at the hangers and they gave me 2 of them for free. They're pretty small, but work fine.

If you're going to the dealer to have them install, I'd say you're better off doing the full bushing - the labor they charge is going to be similar I'd guess.
__________________

CSL replicas are now CSL counterfeits. Jesus saves, like Valentine1.
Chowbow is offline  
0
Reply With Quote
      03-15-2012, 04:47 PM   #10
fromkrypton
Private
 
Drives: 2006 330i
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Candiac

Posts: 94
iTrader: (0)

Garage List
2006 330i  [0.00]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chowbow View Post
I just went to a muffler shop and we looked at the hangers and they gave me 2 of them for free. They're pretty small, but work fine.

If you're going to the dealer to have them install, I'd say you're better off doing the full bushing - the labor they charge is going to be similar I'd guess.
My original idea was to get the M3 bushings but I was afraid no indi garage would have the tools to install them so I ordered the powerflex inserts. I ended up talking to my trusted BMW service adviser and he gave me an amazing price on installing shocks/coils, front/rear M3 sways, and bushing inserts. Oh well in any case hopefully the powerflex inserts will not make the ride as harsh as the M3 bushings would have for my daily driver.

I wonder if I will have the same problem with low exhaust tips on my 330i which only has a single exhaust tip. In any case when I get the car back from the garage I can always just bring it to a muffler place to swap out the hanger if needed. No biggie, I hope.
fromkrypton is offline  
0
Reply With Quote
      03-15-2012, 04:48 PM   #11
Chowbow
pew pew
 
Drives: 三三五i
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: CA

Posts: 6,707
iTrader: (5)

Yeah, I don't think it's a show stopper or anything, but I figure it's something people should know so they don't think their exhaust fits poorly.
__________________

CSL replicas are now CSL counterfeits. Jesus saves, like Valentine1.
Chowbow is offline  
0
Reply With Quote
      03-15-2012, 04:56 PM   #12
fromkrypton
Private
 
Drives: 2006 330i
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Candiac

Posts: 94
iTrader: (0)

Garage List
2006 330i  [0.00]
Thanks for the info! Currently my exhaust fit perfectly. If it ends up hanging lower after the bushing install tomorrow I will now the culprit and not freak out

Thanks again!
fromkrypton is offline  
0
Reply With Quote
      07-12-2012, 12:52 AM   #13
uberschnell
Brigadier General
 
uberschnell's Avatar
 
Drives: // 135i //, X5
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Bay Area

Posts: 3,421
iTrader: (44)

Did these on my 135. So easy, especially with your instructions. I'd say 2 1/2 hours max to get them installed.

Makes a huge difference. I'd say indistinguishable from the m3 bushings on street driving (had a track prepped 335 before). Haven't had a chance to take the car to the track yet but so far it's a bargain compared to the m3 bushings with all the benefit.
__________________
- 08 135i - Wavetrac LSD, AST 4100, Swift springs, Brembo GT brakes, M3 front sway, Meyle HD links, Dinan Camber plates, Whiteline subframe bushings, M3 rear guide and upper link, M3 front control arms, HP custom M3 front Strut brace, Megan rear control arms, F30 brake shields -
uberschnell is offline   No_Country
0
Reply With Quote
      07-12-2012, 12:25 PM   #14
Chowbow
pew pew
 
Drives: 三三五i
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: CA

Posts: 6,707
iTrader: (5)

Quote:
Originally Posted by MteK View Post
Did these on my 135. So easy, especially with your instructions. I'd say 2 1/2 hours max to get them installed.

Makes a huge difference. I'd say indistinguishable from the m3 bushings on street driving (had a track prepped 335 before). Haven't had a chance to take the car to the track yet but so far it's a bargain compared to the m3 bushings with all the benefit.
Good to hear someone who's had both and glad that the thread helped you with the install. I'd guess that the more fresh your original subframe bushings are, the better these will work.
__________________

CSL replicas are now CSL counterfeits. Jesus saves, like Valentine1.
Chowbow is offline  
0
Reply With Quote
      07-12-2012, 12:32 PM   #15
David1
Colonel
 
David1's Avatar
 
Drives: 09 E92 09 X5
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: City With No Room For Ludicris Speed!

Posts: 2,539
iTrader: (0)

I would just cut the part of the insert that actually goes into the stock bushing and shove them in from the bottom. The way they are whole, probably also raises the ride height.
__________________
09 335i Coupe LBM - Black Dakota/Glacier aluminum-6spd|Nav|M-Sport|Premium|Logic7|Heated Seats|CA|BMW Performance Suspension & M3 Control Arms|M3 lip spoiler|Avant Garde M510 Wheels
07 335 coupe - Sold
David1 is offline   United_States
0
Reply With Quote
      07-12-2012, 03:09 PM   #16
David1
Colonel
 
David1's Avatar
 
Drives: 09 E92 09 X5
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: City With No Room For Ludicris Speed!

Posts: 2,539
iTrader: (0)

Where did you get these from?
__________________
09 335i Coupe LBM - Black Dakota/Glacier aluminum-6spd|Nav|M-Sport|Premium|Logic7|Heated Seats|CA|BMW Performance Suspension & M3 Control Arms|M3 lip spoiler|Avant Garde M510 Wheels
07 335 coupe - Sold
David1 is offline   United_States
0
Reply With Quote
      07-13-2012, 08:23 PM   #17
uberschnell
Brigadier General
 
uberschnell's Avatar
 
Drives: // 135i //, X5
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Bay Area

Posts: 3,421
iTrader: (44)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chowbow View Post
Good to hear someone who's had both and glad that the thread helped you with the install. I'd guess that the more fresh your original subframe bushings are, the better these will work.
One thing I noticed on my stock bushings was rub marks between the top of the front bushings and the bottom of the car mount. Leads me to believe the up and down movement of the car is just as bad as the side to side. These inserts definitely eliminate most of the up and down. That's where I think they make the biggest difference.

As for the track, I'll see in a month or two how they compare to M3. In any case, 2.5 hours of DIY and less then $170 vs $600 install + $400 bushings. It's a great alternative.
__________________
- 08 135i - Wavetrac LSD, AST 4100, Swift springs, Brembo GT brakes, M3 front sway, Meyle HD links, Dinan Camber plates, Whiteline subframe bushings, M3 rear guide and upper link, M3 front control arms, HP custom M3 front Strut brace, Megan rear control arms, F30 brake shields -
uberschnell is offline   No_Country
0
Reply With Quote
      07-14-2012, 09:36 AM   #18
mlifxs
Diamond Geezer
 
mlifxs's Avatar
 
Drives: Jet Black 2007 328i Saloon
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Florida

Posts: 1,595
iTrader: (0)

Garage List
Quote:
Originally Posted by MteK View Post
One thing I noticed on my stock bushings was rub marks between the top of the front bushings and the bottom of the car mount. Leads me to believe the up and down movement of the car is just as bad as the side to side. These inserts definitely eliminate most of the up and down. That's where I think they make the biggest difference.

As for the track, I'll see in a month or two how they compare to M3. In any case, 2.5 hours of DIY and less then $170 vs $600 install + $400 bushings. It's a great alternative.
Hi couple quick questions..
How many miles did you have on the orig bushings when you did your inserts?
What is the most time consuming aspect of the install?
mlifxs is online now  
0
Reply With Quote
      07-14-2012, 11:47 AM   #19
uberschnell
Brigadier General
 
uberschnell's Avatar
 
Drives: // 135i //, X5
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Bay Area

Posts: 3,421
iTrader: (44)

Quote:
Originally Posted by mlifxs View Post
Hi couple quick questions..
How many miles did you have on the orig bushings when you did your inserts?
What is the most time consuming aspect of the install?
around 54K, but with no track or auto-x miles on it.

Honestly, there is no one part of this that stands out. even the inserts popped in easily. I did use a pry bar for a second to make a little more space in the front, but that was super easy.

You do most of the work sitting next to your car, not under it. Still, I spent most of my time making sure the car was stable (with 3 jacks and 2 stands).
__________________
- 08 135i - Wavetrac LSD, AST 4100, Swift springs, Brembo GT brakes, M3 front sway, Meyle HD links, Dinan Camber plates, Whiteline subframe bushings, M3 rear guide and upper link, M3 front control arms, HP custom M3 front Strut brace, Megan rear control arms, F30 brake shields -
uberschnell is offline   No_Country
0
Reply With Quote
      07-14-2012, 11:50 AM   #20
uberschnell
Brigadier General
 
uberschnell's Avatar
 
Drives: // 135i //, X5
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Bay Area

Posts: 3,421
iTrader: (44)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chowbow View Post
Good to hear someone who's had both and glad that the thread helped you with the install. I'd guess that the more fresh your original subframe bushings are, the better these will work.
Yeah, I think you had a lot of track and auto-x time on yours before install, correct?

Fortunately I bought my car as a CPO so I have 50K+ miles, but no track time.
__________________
- 08 135i - Wavetrac LSD, AST 4100, Swift springs, Brembo GT brakes, M3 front sway, Meyle HD links, Dinan Camber plates, Whiteline subframe bushings, M3 rear guide and upper link, M3 front control arms, HP custom M3 front Strut brace, Megan rear control arms, F30 brake shields -
uberschnell is offline   No_Country
0
Reply With Quote
      07-18-2012, 12:44 AM   #21
Chowbow
pew pew
 
Drives: 三三五i
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: CA

Posts: 6,707
iTrader: (5)

Quote:
Originally Posted by MteK View Post
Yeah, I think you had a lot of track and auto-x time on yours before install, correct?

Fortunately I bought my car as a CPO so I have 50K+ miles, but no track time.
I had about 35k miles on the car, but a few track events and a lot of autoX runs.

As I have an E36 as well as this E90 that I'm planning on keeping for a while, I might just invest in a hydraulic press so I can change all these suspension bushings routinely. In another year or so I think I'm going to change the whole subframe bushing out to the solid poly ones from Powerflex.
__________________

CSL replicas are now CSL counterfeits. Jesus saves, like Valentine1.
Chowbow is offline  
0
Reply With Quote
      07-19-2012, 12:11 PM   #22
mlifxs
Diamond Geezer
 
mlifxs's Avatar
 
Drives: Jet Black 2007 328i Saloon
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Florida

Posts: 1,595
iTrader: (0)

Garage List
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chowbow View Post
I had about 35k miles on the car, but a few track events and a lot of autoX runs.

As I have an E36 as well as this E90 that I'm planning on keeping for a while, I might just invest in a hydraulic press so I can change all these suspension bushings routinely. In another year or so I think I'm going to change the whole subframe bushing out to the solid poly ones from Powerflex.
thanks this is a great thread and sounds like a low cost lower labor alternative.
Regarding your comment on upgrading to the full bushings, i wonder why you wold prefer the full bushings to the M3? Easier to install than M3? or.....?
mlifxs is online now  
0
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:47 PM.




e90post
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
1Addicts.com, BIMMERPOST.com, E90Post.com, F30Post.com, M3Post.com, ZPost.com, 5Post.com, 6Post.com, 7Post.com, XBimmers.com logo and trademark are properties of BIMMERPOST