E90Post
 


TNT Racewerks
 
BMW 3-Series (E90 E92) Forum > E90 / E92 / E93 3-series Technical Forums > DIY Guides > DIY: N54 HPFP Replacement



Comment
 
Tutorial Tools Search this Tutorial
DIY: N54 HPFP Replacement
Published by Stuart@BMRAutowerkes
02-28-2012
DIY: N54 HPFP Replacement

My HPFP needed changing, here is my DIY.

Disclaimer: you do this at your own risk. Professional installation is encouraged.

Estimated time: 6hours* (highly recommended to let the car cool down overnight. I basically removed everything besides the fuel pump during the night, then the next morning removed the fuel pump itself. This will let the pressure in the fuel lines subside a bit plus will reduce your chances of getting burnt)

Tools you will need:
8mm socket
10mm socket
11mm socket
5mm hex (short Ė i.e youíll be using this in a tight *******
5mm hex (long Ė youíll be using this to reach past other obtrusions)
T20 torx
T25 torx
E12 female torx
17mm OE spanner
18mm OE spanner
24mm OE spanner
Flathead screwdriver
Microfibre towel / shop rag


As of Feb 2012 the latest and greatest fuel pump part number is: 13517616446


You can order it from Tischer here

OK the HPFP replacement can be broken down into around 9 steps of varying difficulty:
1. Removing microfilter & cowl (very easy)
2. Removing airbox (very easy)
3. Removing chargepipe (easy)
4. Removing throttle body (moderate)
5. Removing engine cover (easy)
6. Removing intake manifold (moderate)
7. Disconnecting fuel lines (easy)
8. Removing fuel pump (moderate)
9. Putting it all back together


Step 1: Removing microfilter & cowl
Tools needed: 8mm socket & flathead screwdriver
- Unclip the small black cover on both the driver side and passenger side and wiggle the rubber grommets free from the cover.
- Unscrew the 6 x 8mm bolts holding the microfilter down (red arrows)
- Unscrew the 2 x 8mm bolts holding the cowl in place (blue arrows)
- Disconnect the ambient temperature sensor by unclipping it (green star)
- If your car is fitted with an alarm, disconnect the alarm sensor (yellow star)
- Use your flat head screwdriver to unclip the part of the cowl that attaches to the cabling running through your engine bay (green arrow)

Name:  DSC_0733.JPG
Views: 12360
Size:  216.8 KB

Step 2: Removing airbox
Tools needed: Flathead screwdriver

Assuming you still have your OEM airbox, use your flathead screwdriver to pry open the 7 metal tabs holding the lid in place.
Then using your flathead screwdriver, unscrew the two collars holding piping in place (indicated by the red arrows)
The airbox should now just be held in place by three rubber grommets on the underside of the airbox, gentle rocking back and forth combined with a bit of a yank should free the airbox.
Now, disconnect the vacuum hose fitting indicated in the second pic in the red circle. Simply squeeze the sides together and lift up.

Name:  DSC_0748.JPG
Views: 12810
Size:  246.3 KB
Name:  DSC_0749.JPG
Views: 12403
Size:  247.4 KB

Step 3:Removing chargepipe
Tools needed: Flathead screwdriver, T20 torx (and in my case 8mm socket)

I have an ER chargepipe, so if youíre still OEM, thereís another DIY for removal.
Unscrew the collar (blue circle) with a flathead screwdriver, unbolt the collar (red circle) with an 8mm socket. Itís likely your car will be different, but itís not rocket science youíll be able to figure it out
Then, up near the Ďtop endí of the charge pipe we need to remove an electrical sensor with our T20 (2 screws) indicated by the red arrows, and then use your flathead screwdriver to pry open the clip holding the chargepipe to the intake manifold. Wiggle the sensor out... if your chargepipe has a BOV, slide the vacuum line off the back of it. No pic right now but Iíll show you one later.

Name:  DSC_0750.JPG
Views: 12623
Size:  225.6 KB
Name:  DSC_0751.JPG
Views: 12436
Size:  236.6 KB

Step 4: Removing throttle body
Tools needed: 10mm socket

There are 4 x 10mm fasteners holding the throttle body to the intake manifold. Use your socket to undo them. There is also a vacuum line leading out of the back of the throttle body, squeeze and rotate this and it should come off. The last sensor is fairly obvious, however I couldnít get mine undone. If you can, great, remove the throttle body altogether and keep it in a safe clean place. If youíre like me and canít get it undone, just lay the throttle body to the side of the engine bay Ė thereís plenty of slack in the cable, and cover it with a cloth of some sort to prevent any debris from contaminating it.

Name:  DSC_0759.JPG
Views: 12088
Size:  442.9 KB
Name:  DSC_0763.JPG
Views: 11853
Size:  408.5 KB
Name:  DSC_0765.JPG
Views: 11864
Size:  407.6 KB

Step 5: Removing engine cover
Tools needed: TBA

4 fasteners. Undo them. Lift the cover off and remove gently. Done.
Note: some cars will have a crankcase breather line... mine didnít so I canít show you pics on it. If yours doesnít have it, it will just be a plug like in the pic below. If you do have it, I donít think itís too hard to disconnect.

Name:  DSC_0766.JPG
Views: 11832
Size:  260.7 KB
Name:  DSC_0769.JPG
Views: 12176
Size:  232.8 KB

Step 6: Removing intake manifold
Tools needed: T20 torx and 11m socket

Letís start with the intake manifold sensor, use your T20 torx to undo the 2 screws holding the sensor in place .
Name:  DSC_0756.JPG
Views: 12013
Size:  418.6 KB

Then slide the wiring harness junction box off the bracket on the underside of the intake manifold.
Name:  DSC_0771.JPG
Views: 14256
Size:  237.6 KB

There is an oil pressure sensor switch up near the oil filter (red star), so use your fingers/flat head screwdriver to undo this, keep the clip safe and lay the sensor to the side.
Grab your 11mm socket and undo 7 x 11mm fasteners holding the intake manifold to the engine block. In this photo Iíve marked the obvious ones with a red arrow, but you shouldnít have trouble finding the others.
Name:  DSC_0775.JPG
Views: 11783
Size:  233.9 KB

Removing the manifold itself can get a bit tricky due to space constraints... the piping down the back near the firewall will require a bit of a tug and pull away for the manifold to slide out. Once itís clear though, itís smooth sailing.
Name:  DSC_0780.JPG
Views: 11683
Size:  252.6 KB

Your engine should now look like this
Name:  DSC_0788.JPG
Views: 11656
Size:  321.5 KB

Step 7: Disconnecting fuel line
Tools needed: 24mm spanner, 11mm and 17mm spanner (could be 18, I canít remember), E12 female torx.

This is probably the most hazardous part of the install. The fuel is stored under quite great pressure... however I left the car overnight so when I undid it there were zero dramas, about a teaspoon of fuel dropped out and I had a microfiber there to catch it. For safety sake, undo the fuel line nuts very slowly and wear goggles/protective clothing.
Red circle: use your 24mm spanner to unscrew this fuel line pressure sensor
Green circle: unclips
Blue circle: E12 torx Ė undo this fastener
Yellow star: Iíve forgotten to take a good picture, but this is where youíll find the two fuel line nuts, theyíre pretty obvious. Undo them with a 17 (or 18mm Ė canít remember) spanner. Do the left one first. Move the fuel line out of the way.
Name:  DSC_0800.JPG
Views: 11904
Size:  244.7 KB

Next, use your 11mm socket to undo this fastener (red circle).
Use your 17mm spanner to again undo the fuel line nuts (blue circles). Move the fuel line out of the way.
Name:  DSC_0790.JPG
Views: 13268
Size:  259.2 KB
Name:  DSC_0801.JPG
Views: 11700
Size:  232.8 KB

Step 8: Removing fuel pump
Tools needed: 5mm hex keys (long and short) and a microfibre towel
Now onto the fuel pump. There are 3 x 5mm hex fasteners holding the fuel pump in place.
In this pic, ignore that I havenít removed the fuel lines yet, the pics are just a bit out of order...
You can see the red circle where you will need to use your 5mm hex key to undo the nuts... for the Ďback oneí i.e. closest to the engine block, use the long hex key and go around the fuel pump. Youíll figure it out.
Name:  DSC_0799.JPG
Views: 12221
Size:  242.0 KB

Once the fuel pump starts to become loose you can gently wiggle it out... a bit of oil and fuel will dribble out here. Have your MF handy to clean it up. In my case, barely any came out.

Letís compare old and new...
Name:  DSC_0806.JPG
Views: 11556
Size:  301.8 KB

Where the fuel pump used to be. This is where the oil will dribble out to. Iíve since cleaned it up.
Name:  DSC_0808.JPG
Views: 11406
Size:  418.1 KB


Step 9.

And youíre done (well almost). Put everything back together in a similar fashion to how it was disassembled... youíll figure it out.
The fuel line nuts should be torqued to 30nm but if you donít have a torque wrench just do them tight, without applying excess force. Last thing you will want is to bend/break your fuel line.
Start her up Ė there will be a long crank as the fuel line repressurises and fuel goes through the HPFP for the first time, but then you should be good to go.

Whenever I removed a screw/nut/fastener I wrote it down just in case I forgot where to put it, here's my chart if it helps you:
Name:  DSC_0795.JPG
Views: 11343
Size:  426.7 KB
Tutorial Tools
  #1  
By luster on 02-28-2012, 09:43 AM
You're amazing.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
By RaihaX on 02-28-2012, 10:29 AM
Member reviews
Difficulty [ 1 = Difficult ]
20%20%20%
1
Cost [ 1 = Expensive ]
20%20%20%
1
DIY Clarity [ 1 = Not clear ]
20%20%20%
1
Average 20%
nice DIY stuart, is a shame you are camera shy

Quote:
Originally Posted by luster View Post
You're amazing.
that sounds so gay
Reply With Quote
  #3  
By Dackelone on 02-28-2012, 10:47 AM
Very nice DIY! Thanks for posting!!
Reply With Quote
  #4  
By JohnSprm69 on 02-28-2012, 05:15 PM
Member reviews
Difficulty [ 1 = Difficult ]
20%20%20%
1
Cost [ 1 = Expensive ]
20%20%20%
1
DIY Clarity [ 1 = Not clear ]
20%20%20%
1
Average 20%
wow, this doesn't seem to be as bad as one might think. nice DIY
Reply With Quote
  #5  
By wobbles1 on 03-02-2012, 11:29 PM
Member reviews
Difficulty [ 1 = Difficult ]
20%20%20%
1
Cost [ 1 = Expensive ]
20%20%20%
1
DIY Clarity [ 1 = Not clear ]
20%20%20%
1
Average 20%
You do not buy any means need to remove the manifold. I have done tons of these. Just disconnect the fuel lines and the 1 torx on block for high pressure feed line. after removing throttle body and prying off electrical junction. use a 5 inch extended 5mm alan. easy peasy. also you do not need to loosen the feed line from the pump to the injectors. just twist the pump to remove.The whole job takes me less the 45minutes. But like i said i have probably done 50 of these.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
By Mischa335i on 08-03-2012, 06:50 PM
Member reviews
Difficulty [ 1 = Difficult ]
20%20%20%
1
Cost [ 1 = Expensive ]
20%20%20%
1
DIY Clarity [ 1 = Not clear ]
20%20%20%
1
Average 20%
Partnumber?!

Hey you say the partnumber is 13517616446.

But on the pump is this number 7616194-03 ???

Can you please answer cos i bought the pump with the partnumber 13517616170 (newest) but on the pump is the number "17613933"

Do they send the wrong one?

Thanks

Regards Mike
Reply With Quote
  #7  
By Stuart@BMRAutowerkes on 08-04-2012, 10:01 AM
Member reviews
Difficulty [ 1 = Difficult ]
60%60%60%
3
Cost [ 1 = Expensive ]
80%80%80%
4
DIY Clarity [ 1 = Not clear ]
100%100%100%
5
Average 80%
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mischa335i View Post
Hey you say the partnumber is 13517616446.

But on the pump is this number 7616194-03 ???

Can you please answer cos i bought the pump with the partnumber 13517616170 (newest) but on the pump is the number "17613933"

Do they send the wrong one?

Thanks

Regards Mike
Hi Mike,

the pump "17613933" is an old version - that has been superseded.

I believe the newest and latest model is either the 446 one I posted above or 13517616170. Send it back to where you bought it from and get them to send you the newest one.

Goodluck.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
By david-m on 08-08-2012, 02:18 PM
Nice writeup
Reply With Quote
  #9  
By _ink on 10-20-2013, 09:44 PM
Member reviews
Difficulty [ 1 = Difficult ]
20%20%20%
1
Cost [ 1 = Expensive ]
20%20%20%
1
DIY Clarity [ 1 = Not clear ]
20%20%20%
1
Average 20%
i love you!
Reply With Quote
  #10  
By 335ivargas on 11-06-2013, 05:39 PM
Awsome write up! Thanks man.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
By jason86 on 01-06-2014, 06:04 PM
Heard if do this by the dealer, usually they would reprogram your car as well... You got any issue after for running without the new program update?
Reply With Quote
  #12  
By Stuart@BMRAutowerkes on 01-06-2014, 10:12 PM
Member reviews
Difficulty [ 1 = Difficult ]
60%60%60%
3
Cost [ 1 = Expensive ]
80%80%80%
4
DIY Clarity [ 1 = Not clear ]
100%100%100%
5
Average 80%
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason86 View Post
Heard if do this by the dealer, usually they would reprogram your car as well... You got any issue after for running without the new program update?
I have not heard of it needing re-programming before and the car runs a-ok without any sort of reprogramming.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
By enigma99a on 05-06-2014, 06:12 PM
My HPFP has 7615617-03 which older than yours. Anyone know if this is one with issues?
Reply With Quote
Comment

Bookmarks

Tutorial Tools Search this Tutorial
Search this Tutorial:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:44 AM.




e90post
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
1Addicts.com, BIMMERPOST.com, E90Post.com, F30Post.com, M3Post.com, ZPost.com, 5Post.com, 6Post.com, 7Post.com, XBimmers.com logo and trademark are properties of BIMMERPOST