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      07-15-2012, 11:01 AM   #1
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steps to buying a house?

OK, I am 26, and just got a new job promotion. Looking to buy my first house in the next 6-12 months

I have already lived in apartments, etc, but alays rented.

Questions:

What are the steps I need to take in buying a house?

What are some "inside tips" or information to know of?

How should I go about picking a real estate agent? (There has to be some agents on here that can chime in!)

How do I go about knowing what I can afford?

How do I go about estimating monthly bills, etc.




Any other info would be helpful. This is the start of a new life
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      07-15-2012, 11:54 AM   #2
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BUMP. I'm in the market too. What I've heard is lenders want to see Job security, money in the bank, credit, debts..I've been browsing Zillow, Trulia and Bank.com and they all have tools to see how much house you can afford. Some bank websites offer these tools too..
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      07-15-2012, 12:02 PM   #3
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Not a good market to be buying IMO, even with low rates.
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      07-15-2012, 12:07 PM   #4
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Not a good market to be buying IMO, even with low rates.
you're kidding right?? why not?
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      07-15-2012, 12:16 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MediaArtist View Post
Not a good market to be buying IMO, even with low rates.
That's a blanket statement that depends greatly on where you live.

In California, it's probably not the best choice, but again that depends on a lot of factors. Here in the DC area, its a great time to buy a home, values have pretty much stated constant.

To the original poster:
Find a lender. They will get you started with the process and tell you what you can afford so you can start looking for places in your price range.

Also as some advice...just because a lender says you can afford X amount, doesn't mean you should spend that much. Buy at a price you feel comfortable paying every month. Just make sure you consider insurance, utlitlies, upkeep ect. in your monthly payment estimates.

If you don't watch HGTV, I'd start checking it out. There is a good show called "property virgins" which follows first time buyers through the home buying process. It's a good way to get a taste of the experience.

Good luck.
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      07-15-2012, 12:32 PM   #6
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Quote:
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you're kidding right?? why not?
I'm not kidding. It's a long conversation as to "why not" but basically there is a huge downside to housing, and current housing affordability is based upon government props and market manipulation. Anyone who buys now should be willing to stay in the house for 10-15 years because they might not get any real appreciation before that time period (and even then it's a toss up).
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      07-15-2012, 12:33 PM   #7
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Quote:
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. Here in the DC area, its a great time to buy a home, values have pretty much stated constant.
While it's true that some markets crashed harder than others, and provide better value than other markets, DC is not a great value area based on income, rents, and median home prices.
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      07-15-2012, 12:46 PM   #8
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I'm not looking to buy an investment property. I need a house for my kids to grow up in. I would buy now while the prices and rates are low but my credit score could use a little boost. I have too many inquiries in the past year and I want all my debts to be paid off by 2013.
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      07-15-2012, 12:58 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kevinbahnz View Post
I'm not looking to buy an investment property. I need a house for my kids to grow up in. I would buy now while the prices and rates are low but my credit score could use a little boost. I have too many inquiries in the past year and I want all my debts to be paid off by 2013.
Why not rent a house?
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      07-15-2012, 01:49 PM   #10
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currently renting..
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      07-15-2012, 02:46 PM   #11
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First and foremost take your time and look into the neighborhood. Decide first if you'd like to be there for at least 5-6 years. Make sure the house is just as you like it. It's easy to think you can change things or renovate but keep those ideas to a minimum. Buying a house is like a car, it's not an investment it's your life. Markets are markets and will always be in flux. Find a place you love and don't settle for less.
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      07-15-2012, 03:35 PM   #12
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Step 1 find an agent that you like, ask a friend if they have one that they like. I found my last guy just by visiting an open house.

Step 2 get prequalified. Either go to the bank or ask your agent if there is a broker that is good.

You should be able to figure out the rest.

Generally speaking I think it's a good time to buy, if you plan on staying, not flipping certainly. Your monthly payment is not likely to get much better, markets have taken a beating, and interest rates are low. It doesn't take much of an interest rate up tick to erode a $10000 lower price that may or may not happen (in monthly payment, and total cost).

Buy in the best neighborhood you can, with the best schools. The inventory in my neighborhood is very low, and rents are very strong, it is a bit of a sellers market this summer.

One thing I always have to tell my wife when we are house shopping, focus on the area and the things you can't change, that beautiful new house will get old.
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      07-15-2012, 06:21 PM   #13
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1.) don't worry about not getting appreciation on the house. You probably won't get a windfall on price a la 2002 but you'll still be better off than if renting. Especially since prices have no place to go but up at this point.

2.) stick with the standard 2.5 times salary for housing price but do not be afraid to stretch yourself to the tune of another 10-15 percent on the price of a place you really want. Trust me. If you're in a career where you get regular annual raises and you plan on being in the house for a while, you will wish that you went for the bigger/nicer place in 3-4 years time.

3.) don't dismiss a house that you really like just because of things like paint colors or a bathroom in need of minor upgrades, etc. Look for good 'bones' more than anything else. Im not saying you should buy a place in need of a major overhaul but you'd be surprised how easy many DIY projects can be. Repainting is surprising easy (just requires some time and elbow grease) and tiling or replacing bathroom fixtures can actually be effectively learned on YouTube nowadays. The only thing I won't touch is wallpaper. It's an incredible pain in the butt to remove cleanly.

4.) if you do buy a place where you'd like to make some changes, try to give yourself a month or so between your closing date and the day you actually move in to do the actual work. It's much easier to do work on an empty house than one that's already being lived in. Even if you do not want to make any changes before moving in, do not try to close and move in on the same day. Give yourself at least a couple of days as a cushion to avoid unnecessary stress.

5.) remember that you'll need at least another couple of grand (about 1 to 2 percent of the house price) on top of the down payment and mortgage origination costs in order to close. Thing like taxes and insurance usually require a pretty significant escrow deposit before you can settle the loan and you'll have to pay for things like a property survey, appraisal, etc. Review the good faith estimates (gfe) from your lender in detail, ask a ton of questions, and make sure you have enough cash available to actually close the deal.

6.) DO NOT use any lawyers, inspection companies, etc based solely on your realtors recommendation. The realtors usually have an alterior motive for recommending a certain party (referral deals, etc) and I've found that they rarely recommend anyone really worth hiring. Do your own research before choosing.

7.) review all documents in detail and don't be afraid to challenge or to ask the 'stupid' question just because you've never done this before. You'd be surprised how many clerical mistakes can happen at the lawyers office, mortgage or title company. If you don't understand something, do not sign anything until you have it explained to you.

8.) this is your deal, not someone else's. The realtors and lawyers always try to close the deal in as short a time as possible but do not be afraid to ask them to change the timing to something that works for you if you feel unnecessarily pressured. At the the end of the day, they all work for you.

9.) the classic realtor trick is to show you a couple of properties in less than stellar condition first or properties that they know you will not like before anything else. This way, you will be more likely to really like the first place they show you that is even moderately acceptable according to your requirements. Be aware that this might be happening and try to view all properties against the same standards. don't be afraid to make your realtor earn their commission.
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      07-15-2012, 09:55 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kevinbahnz View Post
I've been browsing Zillow, Trulia and Bank.com
There's your first mistake, Zillow and Trulia do not always have the most up to date information.

Google (city/area you live in) board of Realtors.

From their homepage use the public access to the MLS, this way no Realtor will contact you or get your information. More importantly, you will get to see up to date information on everything which is for sale and listed by a Realtor.
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      07-15-2012, 10:00 PM   #15
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While it's true that some markets crashed harder than others, and provide better value than other markets, DC is not a great value area based on income, rents, and median home prices.
LOL. DC area has some really good incomes - particularly in some of the burbs. Loudoun, Fairfax, and Howard along with Falls church, VA are at the top of the highest income counties (per median) income in the country.

The biggest threat to DC is the threat of cuts in government programs... which is where most people earn their decent incomes.

I was renting in Northern VA for nearly $2000 a month for a nice 1 bedroom apartment (and my rent was increasing annually almost 7%). I bought a townhome here now and my mortgage payment is almost less than what I was paying in rent. The DC area seems to be growing at a pretty good rate since I moved here 4 years ago. I mentioned the biggest risk above; not sure what you mean by "good value"... then again DC has recently been the only area to see a stable / if not improving housing market, unlike most the other parts of the country.

Case in point: I have a friend that has a townhome in Manhattan Beach, CA and he just sold his house and was relieved to get rid of it in the market there. Another case in point: my folks own two homes in Tampa, FL and happy just to be renting the one place since they took a bath on it with the market collapse down there.

If the government starts slashing DoD jobs and other programs related to government in the DC area... then DC folks (myself included) should get concerned about the market imo.


EDIT: And why not to rent a house?

If you have a decent income, no dependents and potentially even single... you take it in the shorts come tax season. I went from owing hundreds when I was renting... to getting hundreds back (still need to adjust my withholding to balance it out). But still there are benefits to owning vs. just renting; not to mention the factor that renting you're at the mercy of the landlord not jacking your rent once you get settled in. My apartment complex was REAL good at this... they knew it was a pain to move out after a year or two of being there, so they'd hit you with a big increase and you'd have to weigh the options of constantly jumping around every couple years. This probably isn't ideal for most people and/or growing families.


Good luck OP - sorry to detract from your thread. I was 25 when I bought my first place... it's a learning experience... but read as much as you can online (trust sources), talk to friends that have bought, talk to your parents, siblings etc. It's a big deal so do your research. Getting pre-approved and finding a good real estate agent are probably good first steps in getting the ball rolling. I'd get pre-approved before seeing an agent so you have an idea of the home you could potentially get. Make an excel spreadsheet and figure out all your costs and compare it to your income. I would not trust a lender on what they approve you for. If they say you can buy a $700k home but you can only afford a $300k home with your life style... then you need to limit yourself and live within your means. Best luck
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      07-15-2012, 10:01 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by double_j View Post
1.) don't worry about not getting appreciation on the house. You probably won't get a windfall on price a la 2002 but you'll still be better off than if renting. Especially since prices have no place to go but up at this point.

2.) stick with the standard 2.5 times salary for housing price but do not be afraid to stretch yourself to the tune of another 10-15 percent on the price of a place you really want. Trust me. If you're in a career where you get regular annual raises and you plan on being in the house for a while, you will wish that you went for the bigger/nicer place in 3-4 years time.

3.) don't dismiss a house that you really like just because of things like paint colors or a bathroom in need of minor upgrades, etc. Look for good 'bones' more than anything else. Im not saying you should buy a place in need of a major overhaul but you'd be surprised how easy many DIY projects can be. Repainting is surprising easy (just requires some time and elbow grease) and tiling or replacing bathroom fixtures can actually be effectively learned on YouTube nowadays. The only thing I won't touch is wallpaper. It's an incredible pain in the butt to remove cleanly.

4.) if you do buy a place where you'd like to make some changes, try to give yourself a month or so between your closing date and the day you actually move in to do the actual work. It's much easier to do work on an empty house than one that's already being lived in. Even if you do not want to make any changes before moving in, do not try to close and move in on the same day. Give yourself at least a couple of days as a cushion to avoid unnecessary stress.

5.) remember that you'll need at least another couple of grand (about 1 to 2 percent of the house price) on top of the down payment and mortgage origination costs in order to close. Thing like taxes and insurance usually require a pretty significant escrow deposit before you can settle the loan and you'll have to pay for things like a property survey, appraisal, etc. Review the good faith estimates (gfe) from your lender in detail, ask a ton of questions, and make sure you have enough cash available to actually close the deal.

6.) DO NOT use any lawyers, inspection companies, etc based solely on your realtors recommendation. The realtors usually have an alterior motive for recommending a certain party (referral deals, etc) and I've found that they rarely recommend anyone really worth hiring. Do your own research before choosing.

7.) review all documents in detail and don't be afraid to challenge or to ask the 'stupid' question just because you've never done this before. You'd be surprised how many clerical mistakes can happen at the lawyers office, mortgage or title company. If you don't understand something, do not sign anything until you have it explained to you.

8.) this is your deal, not someone else's. The realtors and lawyers always try to close the deal in as short a time as possible but do not be afraid to ask them to change the timing to something that works for you if you feel unnecessarily pressured. At the the end of the day, they all work for you.

9.) the classic realtor trick is to show you a couple of properties in less than stellar condition first or properties that they know you will not like before anything else. This way, you will be more likely to really like the first place they show you that is even moderately acceptable according to your requirements. Be aware that this might be happening and try to view all properties against the same standards. don't be afraid to make your realtor earn their commission.
This is solid advice.

One other thought, before even any of these steps: pull your credit report. I think most people know this, but you can get free access to your free report from the 3 agencies once per year. Otherwise, you have to spend like $10 at each agency (total of $30). This will give you an idea of what a lender might say you need to improve, etc., etc.

But you're doing the right thing by getting started early (6-12 months out).
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      07-15-2012, 10:03 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MisterSkiMask View Post
Step 1 find an agent that you like, ask a friend if they have one that they like. I found my last guy just by visiting an open house.

Step 2 get prequalified. Either go to the bank or ask your agent if there is a broker that is good.
A lot of Realtors prefer you to do these steps in reverse.

Always go with your gut when choosing a Realtor, stay away from buyers agent contracts forcing you to stay with a Realtor even if you are unhappy. A lot will say it is company policy. Just don't do it!

Be clear on your parameters and be as specific as possible. Let them know the area's or school districts you want to be in, number of bedrooms, bathrooms, garage space, square footage, anything that is important to you.

If a Realtor becomes impatient or pushy after showing you a few houses, move on to another Realtor. They work for you and are there to make the process smooth for you, not to push you into the first house they think you will buy.

Be patient, if you can't find something you love, wait. I've had buyers look for over a year before they found "the house".

I am a licensed Realtor, but only do it part time.
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      07-16-2012, 12:13 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQ325i View Post
A lot of Realtors prefer you to do these steps in reverse.

Always go with your gut when choosing a Realtor, stay away from buyers agent contracts forcing you to stay with a Realtor even if you are unhappy. A lot will say it is company policy. Just don't do it!

Be clear on your parameters and be as specific as possible. Let them know the area's or school districts you want to be in, number of bedrooms, bathrooms, garage space, square footage, anything that is important to you.

If a Realtor becomes impatient or pushy after showing you a few houses, move on to another Realtor. They work for you and are there to make the process smooth for you, not to push you into the first house they think you will buy.

Be patient, if you can't find something you love, wait. I've had buyers look for over a year before they found "the house".

I am a licensed Realtor, but only do it part time.

I agree completely, you don't have to sign anything for them to show you a house (common move in new developments). I'm very certain that my most recent situation is unique, but there are good realtors out there, we took well over a year (honestly at least two) to find the place that we bought (vacation home), our agent was always the first to point out why we shouldn't buy a place.

The only reason I suggested doing it a bit backward, is if you can find a good realtor you can get plugged into their 'team' and the process can be smooth. There are definitely more bad ones then good ones out there, so be careful.
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      07-16-2012, 06:45 AM   #19
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This is the best time in history to buy. Whomever says otherwise is out of their Gourd.

What you'll need...

-Good credit if not a cash transaction
-stable work history
-attractive income/debt ratio
-low cc debt and/or consumer debt which doesn't include auto loans etc because they are collateral.
-income that allows for the mortgage of the home
-a lender
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      07-16-2012, 09:05 AM   #20
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To add to double_J statement which are all sold.

Most real estate deals are the worst negotiated deals around, why because it is not you and the seller negotiating directly. You have two people acting on your behalf who is only interested in the deal closing and getting their commission. So your agent has no interest in you getting the house at the lowest cost since you cutting his commission and the same goes for the other agent. However, if they think the deal will fall through after they spent a lot of time, they may attempt to get you to agree to things you would not otherwise do.

Never ever tell the agent how much you can afford or willing to afford they will run you up to this limit and tell the other agent not directly, but will indicate what you can afford. Go get pre-approved on your own. Do not use the real estate loan approval services and the such. Work with a bank not a mortgage broker if you can. Once approved then go find yourself an agent, they will tell you they need to know what you can afford before they will take you out to look at houses, it is bullshit, you tell them what you want to spend, and if they have any doubt have them call the bank and the bank should only confirm you are covered for that amount never say what you are approved for. The Real Estate agent may want to see your assets, again none of their business.

Also, do not sign any agreements with Real Estate Agents, they will try to get you to sign a buyers agent agreement, which they claim is to protect you. Most times it actually prevents you from dropping them as your agent. Any agent worth their commission will not make you sign something like this.

If you can afford it put 20% down, verse paying the stupid PMI it is not worth it especially if you plan to stay in your place for some time.

I have moved a number of times and bought a number of homes over the years and I can tell you I have had my run ins with bad agents on both sides. I taught a few agents a few things about how to get the best deal.

The best thing you can do is educate yourself, most agents have no clue about houses and what makes a good house verse a bad one. Also if you plan to buy in a particular location check the town out, go talk to the building inspector and the neighbors in the area to learn about some of the bullshit that going on in some towns which make owning a house a huge liability.

Good luck on your search.

Last edited by Maestro; 07-16-2012 at 09:14 AM.
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      07-16-2012, 09:52 AM   #21
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this is the best time to buy a house....everybody is scare

I'm an investor that buys houses every week.... its the best time to buy now.... all the dumbies out their are scare because they dont know what they are saying.... i buy at 50% off and sometime 75% off market.... its great that a normal person to have a good chance to get in and a buy a house at the lowest rate ever...
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      07-16-2012, 10:00 AM   #22
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find a realtor that knows foreclosers

ask the realtors how many foreclosers have they close and if you have good credit go straight to a bank like capital one, B of A, chase, compass...

if anybody think they know real estate more then me..... i buy more houses then i buy groceries
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