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      08-23-2006, 09:14 AM   #45
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August 23, 2006

www.autobild.de

In German only, but with pics: comparo of e90 330 with Opel Vectra OPC, Mazda MPS (MazdaSpeed), VW Passat 3.2 V6 and the winner is.....

BMW 330.

Second Opel;

Third Mazda;

VW brings up the rear.
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      09-15-2006, 12:28 PM   #46
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http://www.caranddriver.com/roadtest...-bmw-335i.html

2007 BMW 335i - Road Tests
Beauty and the Boost.
BY TONY SWAN, October 2006

-SERIES COUPE
Vehicle type: front-engine, rear- or 4-wheel-drive, 4-passenger, 2-door coupe
Base price: $35,995-$41,295
Engines: DOHC 24-valve 3.0-liter inline-6, 230 hp, 200 lb-ft; twin-turbocharged and intercooled DOHC 24-valve 3.0-liter inline-6, 300 hp, 300 lb-ft

Transmissions: 6-speed automatic with manumatic shifting, 6-speed manual
Wheelbase: 108.7 in
Length/width/height: 180.3/70.2/54.1-54.2 in
Curb weight: 3400-3600 lb
C/D test results (335i):
Zero to 60 mph: 4.9 sec
Zero to 100 mph: 12.1 sec
Street start, 5-60 mph: 5.6 sec
Standing ¼-mile: 13.6 sec @ 105 mph
Top speed (governor limited): 144 mph
Braking, 70-0 mph: 160 ft
Projected fuel economy (C/D est):
EPA city driving: 20-21 mpg
EPA highway driving: 29-30 mpg
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      09-18-2006, 03:42 AM   #47
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Sport Auto Supertest

Sportauto supertest: BMW 335i (including Nurnburgring laptime)

http://e90post.com/forums/showthread.php?t=30140
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      10-06-2006, 01:02 PM   #48
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Road and Track Mags review on 335

http://www.roadandtrack.com/article....rticle_id=3948

A quick glance might lead one to believe that the BMW 335i Coupe is little changed from the E90 3 series sedan. The reality is that this is a new car, with not only a new body, but also a brand-new engine.


Although it rides on the same 108.7-in. Wheelbase as the 3 series sedan, the Coupe is actually 2.1 in. longer and doesn’t share a single body panel with its 4-door brother. Instead, just about everything is new, from the grille and xenon headlights, to the longer, more aggressively sculpted hood to the sloping roofline and larger greenhouse, to the LED taillights.

With a combination of steel, aluminum and plastic, the new Coupe body weighs 22 lb. less than the sedan’s, yet is 25 percent stiffer. Despite the sloping roofline, rear-seat space is impressive, the coupe serving up room for two 6-footers with acceptable knee room and plenty of head room; the trunk, as well, is more than adequate.

But enough about the car's body; what we're most thrilled with is BMW's new twin-turbo direct-injection inline-6. Dubbed the N54, this all-aluminum engine (which supplants the N52's aluminum/magnesium block) is equipped with two very small parallel turbochargers that spool up at the same time. With its front-mounted intercooler this engine generates 300 bhp at 5800 rpm and 300 lb.-ft. of torque from 1300-5000 with a surprisingly high compression ratio of 10.2:1. It has VANOS variable camshaft timing, though it does without the valvetronic variable valve lift seen on the N52.

Push the starter button and it's as smooth and quiet as any BMW inline-6. Surprisingly, it acts like one, too. Instead of turbo lag followed by a high-end rush, the 335i feels like a large-displacement, normally aspirated engine. For this reason — and because you can't hear the turbos — true turbo fans might be disappointed. But there's no denying it's an extremely user-friendly piece, with plenty of sauce for attacking mountain roads and enough reserve to complete "iffy" passing maneuvers. But while BMW claims this setup achieves the power of a V-8 with the weight and fuel effi ciency of a six, the engine lacks a v-8's right-now low-end grunt out of corners.

The 335i comes with a 6-speed manual transmission, which, in BMW fashion, is quite good. A 6-speed automatic with steptronic manual shifting is optional, with 50-percent-quicker reactions than before. When ordered with the sport package you also get paddles behind the thick, well-padded steering wheel, with rev-matching downshifts.

The suspension is basically identical to the sedan's setup but the tuning has been optimized for the Coupe. This means revalved dampers, higher-rate springs, different anti-roll bars and suspension bushings along with a 0.6-in.-lower ride height. And when you need to bring the fun to a halt (what a shame!), the 335i has larger brakes than the 330i sedan — 13.7-in. front rotors compared with 13.0. Pedal feel is reassuringly firm.

So how does it handle? Quite well, as would be expected of a BMW and a rear-drive coupe with a claimed 50/50 front/rear weight distribution. The 335i exhibits an excellent compromise of a decent ride but more-thandecent handling, with precise steering and a ready-to-attackall- corners attitude. Understeer is prevalent in the tight stuff, and shows itself again through fast corners when you're really getting on with it. With this built-in safety net, I had to really try to get the tail to come out. But when i did (with DSC off, of course), the 335i was completely controllable, forgiving and, most important — fun. It was surprising, though, to find the rear bottoming out during a particularly fast and bumpy section.

When the 335i Coupe goes on sale in september (with an MSRP of $41,295), it will be joined by the 328i Coupe ($35,995) with a 230-bhp 3.0-liter inline- 6, followed by the first 3 series coupe with all-wheel drive — the 328xi — in October for $37,795.

While the 335i Coupe is no M3, it produces enough excitement for all but the most hardcore enthusiasts. and with the M3 discontinued for 2007 as we await the all-new V-8 car, it's a pretty good stopgap.
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      10-10-2006, 09:07 AM   #49
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cars.com 335i coupe vs 2007 g35 sedan

kinda short...

http://blogs.cars.com/kickingtires/2...o_head_20.html
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      10-29-2006, 09:15 PM   #50
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BMW's Super Coupe (Businessweek magazine)

http://www.businessweek.com/autos/co...tm?chan=search
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      11-15-2006, 05:33 AM   #51
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E92 335D Review

Just to keep the international slant ... here is a review of the most expensive E92 you can buy in Europe :

http://www.autocarmag.com/FirstDrive...p?RT_ID=222996

BMW 3 Series Coupe 335d SE 2dr
Test Date 01/11/2006 10:34:00
Price when new £35,475

BMW 3 Series (05-) 335d SE 2dr Coupe

What is it?
The new 3-series coupe, fitted with an uprated version of the twin-turbo diesel engine from the 535d (now with 427lb ft and 282bhp).


What's it like?
Quick. Unless you have iron resolve, this oh-so-tremendously worthy diesel coupé will get you into more trouble than you know how to get out of.

The 335d simply demolishes any acceleration interval below three figures – and doesn’t let up much thereafter. It’ll rev in a very undiesel-like way – a pleasant attribute, but not particularly relevant.

The engine’s real weapon is the sledgehammer effect of all that torque through the mid-range and the hushed manner in which it is delivered. The turbo petrol 335i would ultimately be faster, but in a real-world test the diesel is easier to drive quickly, whether intentionally or by accident. This is partly because the diesel is only available with BMW’s retuned six-speed automatic, which sweeps gearchanges past almost unnoticed and gives you very little against which to benchmark your rapidly escalating speed.

Choosing between the petrol and the slightly more expensive diesel is difficult, because both engines perfectly complement the svelte new 3-series coupé. There isn’t even much difference on the scales – just 30kg, which is not enough to make a discernible difference to the handling on our test. Nor are there any significant distinguishing visual clues; no downturned diesel exhausts here, just two chromed pipes like the turbo petrol.

Should I buy one?
Decently economical (BMW claims 37.7mpg on the combined cycle, and even with the most lead-footed approach we couldn’t get below 25mpg), monumentally strong and suitably sophisticated, the 335d coupé is a dead-cert contender for title of All The Car You’ll Ever Need. Or it would be, except that it’s possible to get the same engine in 3-series saloon and Touring shells, and it’s the Touring that tempts us most: practical, upmarket and so effortlessly rapid. Just make sure you hang on to your licence long enough to enjoy it.
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      11-15-2006, 05:35 AM   #52
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E92 335D

And another :

http://www.autoexpress.co.uk/news/mo...w_3series.html

BMW 3-Series
BMW 335d SE Coupé
Rating: *****

Munich’s master engine builder is set to blow away the opposition yet again!

There is no doubt that BMW has rediscovered the art of turbocharging petrol units with its magnificent twin-turbo 306bhp motor, now available across the 3-Series range.

But it is not the only new forced-induction 3.0-litre engine to be fitted to the compact executive model. The hi-tech petrol motor may have been attracting all the headlines, yet behind the scenes engineers have taken the range-topping diesel out of the 535d and put that into the 3-Series, too. And as if that wasn’t enough, they’ve tweaked it to liberate more power and torque.

As a result, the 335d Coupé has an extra 14bhp and 20Nm – the latter produced 250rpm further down the rev range. In fact, BMW fans may remember that, with 286bhp, this diesel coupé has the same power output as the M3 from 1993. But as with all oil-burners, it’s best to let the torque do the talking – and boasting 580Nm at 1,750rpm, the new coupé has plenty to say. Straight-line pace is amazing, as the oil-burner provides boost pressure virtually from tickover.

Acceleration builds quickly, but that’s not to say power comes in suddenly and tails off – consistent, responsive perfor-mance is delivered across the rev band. Linked to the superb Steptronic six-speed auto (there’s no manual), it makes the 335i petrol version feel flat at low revs. Smooth, hushed and well mannered, it may not sound as enticing as its stablemate, but in everyday situations, the 335d is faster.

It’s just a pity the Coupé looks relatively mundane next to rivals such as the Audi TT. However, providing good space, a comfortable driving environment plus sublime road manners, this is one polished performer. Want more practicality? It’s also available in £32,995 saloon and £34,165 Touring guises
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      11-27-2006, 09:49 AM   #53
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Inside Line 335 Coupe Review

http://www.edmunds.com/insideline/do...hotopanel..1.*

One more.
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      12-01-2006, 04:05 PM   #54
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EVO Magazine July 2006 : BMW 320Si

4 out of 5 stars.

July 2006.

Text : Jethro Bovingdon.

If there are two more evocative words in the motoring lexicon than ‘homologation special’, I haven’t heard them. Place the letters ‘BMW’ in front and I don’t mind admitting I go a bit weak at the knees, images of CSL Batmobiles, E30 M3 Sport Evos and the sublime M1 flashing through my mind. OK, perhaps this can’t be considered strictly ‘normal’ behaviour, but I suspect that you might understand where I’m coming from.

So, assuming I’m amongst likeminded friends here, may I introduce the strictly limited edition 320si, BMW’s latest homologation special, 400 of which will be coming to the UK from a total production run limited to 2500 cars – just enough to satisfy WTCC homologation rules.



Sitting low on its springs, the unique and beautiful forged 18in rims tucked-up in its arches, the E90 3-series has never looked so good. At £25,000 it’s no wonder all 400 UK-bound 320sis have already found buyers.

Yep, £25,000. Sounds good for a hardcore WTCC refugee, doesn’t it? Open the bonnet and it looks good value, too. Mounted low in the engine bay and topped by a gorgeous carbonfibre cylinder-head cover (saving 10kg and lowering the centre of gravity) sits a hand-built 2-litre ‘four’.

The cylinder head itself is cast alongside the F1 heads at Landshut; the engine is then hand-finished at Hams Hall, near Coventry. With bigger valves, unique alloy cylinder liners, different bore and stroke, a higher compression ratio and a higher rev limit, it’s safe to say that it’s thoroughly revised.



The result, however, isn’t even close to 100bhp per litre, which is a little disappointing. 170bhp at 7000rpm and 147lb ft at 4250rpm is hardly the stuff of which legends are made, especially in a car that weighs 1425kg. BMW claims a top speed of 140mph (which speaks well of the Three’s aerodynamics) and a 0-62mph sprint of 8.1sec – numbers that wouldn’t worry an RX-8 owner, let alone get M3 drivers glancing nervously in their mirrors.

It’s a homologation car, then, but not as we know it. But that’s not to say it should be written off as simply a marketing exercise. Power may be up by just 22bhp over a standard 320i, but the way the screaming four-pot delivers is very different. It still feels smooth and torquey at low revs, but there’s a vigour over and above 5500rpm that isn’t present in a normal 320i. The noise is fantastic, too, a tight metallic timbre that’s bursting with aggression.



Tap into the high-rev fireworks and the 320si punches harder than its 170bhp power figure would suggest, although it’s still a car in which you meticulously maintain momentum rather than rely on the engine’s grunt to cover your mistakes. And that’s really the joy of it. Without huge torque to create traction issues, the chassis feels beautifully balanced (it’s the same set-up as a 320i with the optional M Sport suspension). Turn-in is very quick and totally assured – you can actually feel the lower centre of gravity – and even when you’re carrying as much speed as you dare there’s virtually no understeer. If the corner is long enough to keep the tyres loaded, the si gradually makes the transition into very mild oversteer. Not enough to need correction, more of a rear-led four-wheel drift.

I love the way the 320si allows you to compress every corner into a seamless and efficient action. Turn in, feel the nose bite instantly, then jump on the power – no waiting for the car to settle or fearing the tail might snap away. Stay disciplined and use the si’s grip and poise and it’s a really addictive car to drive. The feeling that you’re squeezing every last drop from engine and chassis is genuinely thrilling.

It’s not perfect. Like all modern BMWs it has a peculiarly bouncy ride on tough surfaces, but the 320si is much more fun than I’d expected. The brakes are strong and feelsome, the gearbox easy and precise, the steering a shade heavy at low speeds but quick and accurate as the pace picks up. It may not go down as one of the great homologation specials, but it’s no disgrace to describe it with those two hallowed words.

Source : http://www.evo.co.uk/carreviews/evoc...bmw_320si.html
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      12-06-2006, 12:26 AM   #55
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E92 335i review

http://www.auto123.com/en/info/news/...tid=72616&pg=1

Two perfect turbos.

As I was driving home from work in the 335i one night, I happened upon one of the E90's much older siblings. Beside me, in traffic of course, was a
2007 BMW 335i Coupe (Photo: Philippe Champoux, Auto123.com)
clean 1987 E30 BMW 325is. It dawned on me right at that moment that 20 years had passed since the introduction of the then ultimate 3-Series (pre-M3). It also reminded me of one of my first exciting rides in a car; it was in my father's friend's black 1987 325is. That car was fast and furious especially for an 11 year-old impressionable boy who loved cars.

Back in the day, 168 hp out of a 2.5L I-6 was something to write home about especially in a car that weighted a mere 1,250 kg. Not only was it fast, it offered nearly unmatched handling because of its perfect 50/50 weight distribution and a sporty suspension. Its brakes were powerful and all of this was mixed with a premium interior assembled with perfect craftsmanship.

Better than it was when it was already great
Here we are 20 years later and the good things have gotten better. The only negative is that the car has gotten heavier but BMW has seen to it that performance would not be affected in any way, shape or form. The 335i's weight is up about 25% over the 325is but then horsepower has nearly doubled. With 300 hp storming out of the twin-turbocharged 3.0L I-6, the 335i merely crushes those that dare oppose it at a stop light.
2007 BMW 335i Coupe (Photo: Philippe Champoux, Auto123.com)
According to BMW, the 335i reaches 100 km/h in 5.6 seconds. I am convinced that this is a conservative number. The whole time I had the car, the weather spat rain and drizzle and made some testing conditions less than ideal.

This badass coupe just feels so much faster; with a proper launch, the 335i must be able to clip a buck in just over 5 seconds. All of BMW's engines always sign a melodious tune. Turbos usually hush-up the exhaust note but in this case, BMW has tweaked the sound to make the car hum a little more seriously. No longer does the 3.0L purr, it now growls. The forced-induction massage given to the I-6 is flawlessly executed. At low revs, the massive 300 lbs of torque rushes to the rear wheels. As the engine speed climbs, all 300 hp continue to pull all the way to the red-line. This is perhaps the best balanced power delivery I have ever experienced.

Power is nothing without control
And the 335i is all about control. Every mechanical component works to
2007 BMW 335i Coupe (Photo: Philippe Champoux, Auto123.com)
the very best of its design to deliver cat-like reflexes, rail-like handling and drag-parachute-like stopping distances. Initial bite on turn-in is phenomenal; it takes but a fraction of a second between the thought of moving the wheel, the hand movement and the car's reaction to the steering input. Likewise, the brakes respond masterfully to any amount of effort from the driver.

This 3-Series is the first that I find to have a hard ride. All other BMWs entertain the driver with both comfort and handling. This 335i is perhaps only guilty of sporting the optional 19" alloys; this would be my guess. Montreal roads are not exactly friendly to 19" wheels and 30 profile tires. Although the big rims look absolutely hot, the standard 17" or even the optional 18" rolling stock would possibly smoothen things over.

My other office
I was talking about high-end interiors before; the 335i's cabin is certainly upscale although it remains austere and very utilitarian. BMW has
2007 BMW 335i Coupe (Photo: Philippe Champoux, Auto123.com)
managed to create an environment that is classy, elegant and purposefully simple. Not only are all controls within easy reach of the driver, they work with up-most precision. Ambient lighting is very popular now in luxury cars but BMW has taken it one step further: mood-lighting is not only present from the ceiling of the car, light is emitted from the door panel trim all the way to the rear-side panel in the rear.

Common to most BMWs are formidable front seats. The usually cajole its occupants with comfort and support. The 335i's are all that plus they feature adjustable side bolsters; perfect for nearly every body type. The rear buckets are versatile and roomy enough to accommodate adults if for only a short drive.

3-Series front with some 8-Series rear
The new Coupe is, as always, largely inspired on the sedan. From the "A" pillars forward, both body styles are nearly identical. The Coupe does look more aggressive and tauter. When looking at the rear quarters of the
2007 BMW 335i Coupe (Photo: Philippe Champoux, Auto123.com)
Coupe, 8-Series cues are apparent; the taillight design and shape and the nearly flat trunk lid. At one point while staring at the car's behind, I thought I saw some mid-nineties Chevy Caprice because of the large tail but I must have just been tired from my long day at work.

I love frameless doors; they look streamlined and clean regardless if the window is up or down. The downsides to this design are usually associated with wind noise, squeaks and even water penetration. I was surprised and disappointed to find to wind penetration and door rattles in this car.

Is there such a thing as too much perfection?
It is possible. If all cars were built to the same standards, there would be nothing to compare them to. BMW consistently demonstrates that it can build some of the most attractive and desirable cars on the road. Although many buy BMWs for the logo, it is nice to know that all in all, they are still
2007 BMW 335i Coupe (Photo: Philippe Champoux, Auto123.com)
great cars to drive. Lexus is presently the only manufacturer in my opinion that is seriously trying to dethrone the full package that is the 3-Series. There IS is stunning, fast, well assembled and a real quality car... if only the IS350 was available with a 6-speed manual gearbox.

In the end, all I can say is that the 335i, whether it be in 2 or 4-door guise, is exquisitely entertaining and fast. I can only imagine what the next M3 will be like...

The 3-Series Coupe has a starting price of $43,600. At the other end of the spectrum, a fully equipped 335i retails for nearly $70,000.

Good stuff:
BMW engine + 2 turbos
Great seats
Incredible brakes and handling.

No so good stuff:
Weird rear-end treatment
Wind noises and a few rattles

Competitors: (Non Coupes)

Lexus IS350
Infiniti G35
Acura TL Type-S
Mercedes C350
Audi A4 3.2
Volvo S60R
Competitors: (Coupes)

Mercedes CLK350
Infiniti G35 Coupe
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      12-06-2006, 02:35 PM   #56
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Lets just say its a very DRAMATIC review

http://drivechannel.blogspot.com/200...road-test.html
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      12-07-2006, 06:57 PM   #57
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Roundel, December 2006

http://www.bmwcca.org/roundel/december2006
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      12-15-2006, 12:23 PM   #58
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IGN 335i Coupe Review

Here is a link to a nice review of the 335i Coupe. They really beem about the car:


http://cars.ign.com/articles/749/749352p1.html
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      12-22-2006, 10:44 AM   #59
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Thumbs up A Nice WSJ Article on the 335i Coupe - 12/22/06

THE DRIVER'S SEAT
By JEFF SABATINI


BMW Recharges a Favorite
December 22, 2006; Page W11C
Ask anyone who makes a living reviewing cars to choose a daily driver, and chances are good that a BMW 3-Series will be their pick. For going on two decades, BMW's best-selling model has been a favorite of driving enthusiasts, taking up residence on Car and Driver magazine's "10 Best" list back in 1992 and remaining there ever since.

It's unsurprising, then, that the redesigned 2007 BMW 3-Series coupe sticks to the same basic recipe. But its exhilarating power, exceptional handling and classy sheet metal make it the best of its ilk since Bill Clinton lived on Pennsylvania Avenue. The new coupe plays to its core supporters as predictably as a presidential fund-raiser, yet some of its most notable changes hint at a new constituency: the import "tuner" crowd.


BMW's new 335i adds touches that may draw the speed-minded 'tuner' crowd.
Yes, that would be those youthful drivers who think the only thing sweeter than a buzzing 4-inch exhaust tip is the sound of a chattering turbocharger, whose Honda Civics sport wings larger than a HondaJet airplane.

If the thought of these punks rolling along in Bimmers seems odd, consider that according to the Specialty Equipment Market Association, which represents makers of auto add-ons, the tuner crowd generated $5.04 billion in U.S. retail sales last year. Clearly, these kids merit their reputation for sinking every last bit of disposable income into their cars. But it's been over a decade since the tuner scene got its start in Southern California, so many of them are now well into their 30s and hold down jobs that pay more than delivering pizzas.

BMW may not admit to actively courting this market, but it can't pretend it isn't aware of the import tuners. No one in the car business underestimates them as style mavens or doubts their influence on automotive trends. (It wasn't an auto maker that decided that big, 18-inch wheels look cool.) And even if the Germans didn't hold a marketing clinic for tuners to ponder the direction of the new 3-Series coupe, the results speak for themselves.

Exhibit A is that the top-of-the-line 3-Series now has a turbocharged engine. Tuners like turbos because they can dramatically boost horsepower, and the 335i has not just one but two of them. They help launch the car like a weapon snapped from a catapult. The 3.0-liter in-line six-cylinder engine puts out an impressive 300 horsepower, but what's really amazing is its peak torque output of 300 pound-feet occurs when the engine is revving as low as 1,400 rpm. This makes for brutal acceleration at any speed, and rewards a medieval driving style in which every car on the road is fair game for passing.

For all its potential energy, however, the 3-Series coupe looks best standing still. The car has graceful lines and a skin that seems elegantly draped over its structure, the simplest and most stunning BMW design in years. The coupe's curves are more traditional than the controversial and cacophonous blend of convex and concave shapes that have come to be associated with Chris Bangle, BMW's oft-criticized design director. Parked next to a 3-Series sedan or wagon, the two-door version is even easier to appreciate. Long and sleek, the coupe appears to ride much lower to the ground than its misshapen siblings, an illusion that is helped by its optional 18-inch wheels and low-profile tires. The kids might call it "pre-slammed."

They should also appreciate what BMW calls the belt feeder, a pair of arms that automatically pop out from behind the front seats to push the seatbelts forward, in true Pimp My Ride fashion. This is a novel, if unnecessary, feature, however, and it grows tiring to have to wait for the belt to be delivered each time you hop in the car.

Warm and Inviting

But other new features on the 3-Series coupe represent actual advances, including what seems to be the quickest-shifting conventional automatic transmission extant. This new optional six-speed unit is available with de rigueur steering-wheel-mounted paddle shifters.

The interior in the 3-Series is warm and inviting, and puts the cold austerity of BMW's more expensive coupe, the $74,000 650i, to shame. BMW's infernal iDrive interface -- a multifunction knob and menu system for the radio, climate control and other accessories that many customers have found difficult to master -- is optional rather than standard, another major selling point.

Japanese manufacturers are going after the same market as BMW -- and would like to hold on to the tuner crowd if they move up to luxury brands. When the time comes to trade in that clapped-out Honda Prelude there are certainly some reasonable options, starting with Honda's Acura TSX and TL. Nissan took its own very strong shot at BMW with the 2007 Infiniti G35 sedan; a redesigned coupe version of the G will be arriving next year. Toyota has been trying to clone the 3-Series sedan itself for the past six years, through two generations of its Lexus IS. Even Toyota's Scion tC begs to be considered a half-price, imitation 3-Series coupe.

These are all good cars, but BMW's cachet comes in large part from the fact it offers no mainstream products to taint its bloodline. Younger car enthusiasts may be brash, but they're not ignorant. They know the 3-Series is authentic, and no matter how close the competition matches the BMW in performance or beats it on price, the Japanese are still the imitators.

Write to Jeff Sabatini at jeff.sabatini@wsj.com
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      12-26-2006, 08:01 PM   #60
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BMW 335i Coupe - The Velvet Hammer

Interesting article and review:


"BMW 335i Coupe - The Velvet Hammer "

http://www.eurotuner.com/featuredveh...mw_335i_coupe/
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      01-17-2007, 03:50 PM   #61
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In www.canadiandriver.com

Review of the 335 coupe - the reviewer could not get over the new engine.

I didn't realise to what extent BMW has changed the game with the N53: the competition is rendered on the defensive completely, including the new G and IS350.
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      01-30-2007, 01:46 PM   #62
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Motortrend reviews the E93 convertible:

http://www.motortrend.com/roadtests/...ble/index.html
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      02-08-2007, 01:08 AM   #63
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http://www.latimes.com/classified/au...-home-highway1

RUMBLE SEAT / DAN NEIL
Sure money
Despite the price, BMWs remain hugely popular. The new 335i Coupe, with a seriously great turbocharged engine and fine interior, demonstrates why.
DAN NEIL

February 7, 2007

WHAT'S in your portfolio? Are you a high-risk investor or do you prefer the slow and reliable clink-clink of blue-chip stock? Personally, I've got all my money tied up in a racehorse named Barbaro. What? No way! When'd that happen?

I would love to see a survey of BMW owners and their investments. I'd suspect Bimmer buyers play it pretty conservative in the market. These cars are such a safe bet that to buy one seems to make a statement about one's fundamental disposition to risk. I'm not talking only about residual value — though BMWs hold their value exceedingly well. Good thing, too, since they're overpriced.

I'm talking about exposure. Why, after all, do people buy these cars? Is it because of BMW's exemplary handling and performance? Please. For most Americans, it's a red-letter day if they can negotiate the drive-thru at In-N-Out Burger. Is it BMW's grand motorsports heritage? Again, most Americans wouldn't know a Sauber-BMW F1 car if it cut them off at the shins.

It's because — as sure as Prince is an all-weather rock star — BMWs represent good taste and unimpeachable judgment, a kind of mass-market connoisseurship endorsed by the sheer numbers sold. Even if you know nothing about automobiles, you know BMWs are well regarded, and you can sleep at night knowing that, as compared to the rather more uncertain investment in, say, Infiniti. What Partagas is to cigars and Fender is to guitars, so BMW is to cars.

It would be tempting to dismiss BMWs as totems of affluent groupthink but for the fact that they are, in fact, terrific cars, and the new BMW 335i Coupe is just a killer. As per the Werks' methodical ways, the Coupe came late last summer, about a year after the 3-series sedan (the E90 chassis, in the specialist's nomenclature) hit the streets. With the two-door, BMW introduced a sparkling new bit of reciprocating machinery: a 3.0-liter, twin-turbocharged and intercooled, direct-injection inline six-cylinder motor with variable valve timing, all milled from the finest Bavarian aluminum. From three liters of displacement, this engine manages to produce a nice, round 300 horsepower and an even nicer and rounder 300 pound-feet of torque, using the small, lag-free turbos to force-feed three cylinders apiece. For 2007, this motor replaces the naturally aspirated 3.0-liter in the four-door (335i sedan) and in the future you can expect BMW product planners to put this motor in everything but their coffee. It's already in the 2008 3-series cabriolet and the 5-series (535i by name).

OK, Bimmerphiles, quiz time: What was the first BMW in the U.S. to offer a turbocharged engine? Please write me a long, involved e-mail about the history of the 1974-era 2002 Turbo and then forget to send it.

THIS is a seriously great engine. First of all, look at the fuel economy: 20 miles per gallon city, 29 mpg highway. I'm wondering if this isn't the most fuel-efficient 300-horsepower coupe on the market. Thank you, direct injection. Second, this engine feels like the log flume ride at Six Flags Over Torque. Full torque arrives at a mere 1,400 rpm and doesn't begin to dissipate until 5,000 rpm. Even then the car feels so giddy and besotted with rpm that it's easy to bump up against the 7,000-plus rev limiter in the first two gears.

These compact turbos spool up with nary a breath of hesitation, giving the car a throttle response indistinguishable from a bigger, naturally aspirated motor. Put your foot down and the car just pulls like a reindeer. Zero-to-60 mph acceleration hovers in the range of 5 seconds flat, but that hardly does justice to the right-here, any-gear eagerness of the motor. In sixth gear at highway speeds, the twin-turbo still has enough amperage to draw you back into the deep-bolstered seat.

In turbo cars, such festive displays of acceleration are typically accompanied by contraltos of turbine whine and big sucking sounds. This twin-turbo puts a very expensive sock in all that, and the most notable sound is a plush, plummy bass vibrato coming from the exhaust pipes.

This is not the handsomest coupe on the market but it's certainly presentable for class reunions and business meetings. It has the proper profile — BMW's wheels-in-the-nose front overhang, smooth hood and windshield transitions, and the bustle butt. Yet it's hard to look at the car and not see it as missing something, that something being two rear doors, which is to say, the car doesn't look to me organically coupe-like.

The surface tension of the sheet metal has been dialed up compared to the sedan, and the fuselage has a down-the-road lean by virtue of the gently arched beltline that runs from the front fender into the rear light assembly, with its bands of LED lighting. Up front, BMW's road-following, bi-Xenon headlights are standard equipment. In the daytime the glassy rings around the projector lens glow eerily — think Cujo with mega-candlepower.

Our test car ($46,340) did not have the company's dastardly iDrive system (it's a $2,100 option) and yet somehow, remarkably, I didn't miss it. The 335i's interior is a seamless, stately blending of rich materials and clean modernism.

Rear-seat access is a major theme in the Coupe. In addition to a cam-over lever that moves the seats forward and back, there is a toggle on the seat shoulder that allows the rear passenger to adjust the seat ahead. Also — in deference to the less spine-flexible of its clients — the company uses belt extenders, motorized wands that hand front passengers the shoulder belts when they get in the car. Note also that this is a two-seat back seat; the center console extends between the rear seat positions.

BMW has obviously invested thousands of man-hours in interior design — much of that prime beer-drinking time, so to all of you, prost!

In addition to the company's signature handling, cornering, ride and braking behavior (all dialed up a touch with the sport package's 18-inch wheels and racy run-flat tires), the 335i supplies a generous list of standard features, including: dynamic cruise control; moon roof; adaptive brake lights (they strobe during emergency braking); rain-sensing windshield wipers; and all manner of intelligent braking, traction- and stability-enhancing systems.

Sleek, secure, well tailored, and stronger than day-old coffee, the BMW 335i Coupe is yet more proof — as if its competitors needed it — that this company has a crystal-clear sense of itself and its customers.

You know, sometimes you follow the herd because sometimes the herd knows something you don't. Moo.

*

-----------------------------------------------------
dan.neil@latimes.com

*

(INFOBOX BELOW)

2007 BMW 335i Coupe

Base price: $41,295

Price, as tested: $46,340

Powertrain: Twin turbocharged and intercooled 3.0-liter dual-overhead cam inline six-cylinder with variable valve timing; six-speed manual transmission; rear-wheel drive

Horsepower: 300 at 5,800 rpm

Torque: 300 pound-feet at 1,400 to 5,000 rpm

Curb weight: 3,571 pounds

0-60 mph: 5 seconds

Wheelbase: 108.7 inches

Overall length: 181.1 inches

EPA fuel economy: 20 miles per gallon city, 29 mph highway

Final thoughts: A reason to invest in a thoroughbred.
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      02-11-2007, 07:55 PM   #64
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328i e90 sedan review by Warren Brown of the Washington Post

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...020800767.html

Plenty of Get Up and Go Have Fun

By Warren Brown
Washington Post Staff Writer
Sunday, February 11, 2007; G01



CHICAGO


My flight arrived from Las Vegas in the middle of a mild winter storm. Such storms are normal for Chicago. Local snow-removal crews are ready for them. And this storm barely left enough snow to remove.

But planes were stacked at O'Hare International Airport like models on a display shelf -- frozen, immobile, undergoing or awaiting de-icing. The Las Vegas flight arrived several minutes late at an already occupied gate, leaving its pilots no choice except to taxi around runways until that gate became available.

In such moments, when I have no control over what is happening, I find solace in memories of when I was master of my fate. I did not have to look back far. A week earlier in Virginia, I drove the 2007 BMW 328i sedan -- a superbly engineered and crafted automobile, a total joy to drive.

It was "crimson red," a bright red color named by designers who think "bright red" isn't descriptive enough. It had a sand-tone interior augmented by judicious applications of burl walnut trim. The seats were covered in optional Dakota leather -- a grain more supple and bottom-friendly than many animal hides used in cars and trucks.

But the thrill was in the driving, an assessment shared with my assistant, Ria Manglapus. We both took long turns at the wheel, accumulating 427 miles of road running between us.

It was the sheer smoothness of it all -- the ease with which the 328i consumed highways, its dance-like nimbleness in city traffic. The car went exactly where pointed -- no wavering, wobbling or hesitation, just excellent directional stability at any speed.

We both fussed with the reverse gear of the 328i's manual six-speed transmission. But we figured it out, pushing it down a bit and then shoving it left and up. We became accustomed to it, fell in love with its rhythm and feel, and wondered why we ever thought we had a problem with that lever.

But, yes, the matter of control. . . . Nothing compares with getting into a well-engineered car and driving for hours on end, going where you choose often at the speeds you choose to travel. The developers and designers of the 328i understand that happiness and have given us the perfect automobile in which to pursue it.

It is not so much a luxury car as it is a driver's car bereft of clich?. Nearly all new automobiles in the $30,000 range have pleasant interiors, reasonable overall good looks and a host of amenities, such as heated seats. But not all of those cars beg to be driven. Not all of them feel as wedded to curves, as stable on high-speed straightaway runs, or as remarkably agile as the 328i in emergency maneuvers.

And not all of them provide the peace of mind afforded by the 328i on steep inclines.

For example, many drivers of manual transmission cars dislike steep hills because of what can be called "back slip" -- the tendency of many manual cars to roll backward on such terrain.

"But this one had no back slip at all," Ria said. "Wow! I love this car!"

I tried it myself, deliberately finding and climbing the steepest hills, stopping, and then shifting to first or second gear. No back slip -- none, zilch, nada.

I could prattle endlessly about the rear-wheel-drive BMW 328i's many technical attributes -- its in-line six-cylinder, 230-horsepower engine housed in a strong, but lightweight magnesium-aluminum block; its five-link, five-beam rear suspension that contributes to superior handling, even on dicey roads; its variable valve timing Valvetronic system that helps deliver more horsepower and improve fuel efficiency.

But all of that would be meaningless in a car if it did not deliver on the road. The 328i delivers, which is more than I can say for the air-travel system that brought me here with its multiple delays, irritable flight attendants, repeated reminders to be suspicious of everyone in airports for fear of terrorism, inexplicable unavailability of an arrival gate and lost luggage.
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      02-15-2007, 11:48 AM   #65
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Road and Track - March 2007 - 335i Sedan Review

2007 BMW 335i
A perfect fit between the solid, reasonably quick 328i and the hell-for-leather M3.
By Douglas Kott
March 2007
Road and Track

2007 BMW 335i (Sedan)

Most complete write up I've seen to date on the 335i Sedan.
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      02-15-2007, 11:55 AM   #66
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Review copied from jarlaxie link (just in case site changes etc)

If you're a golfer, you gotta love the gap wedge. Mine has 52 degrees of loft, and is good for about 100 yards barring any sort of operator error. It's called the gap wedge because it neatly fills the void between the sand wedge (80 yards on a good day) and pitching wedge (maybe 115 when the ball's sitting up nice).
Automotively speaking, BMW's latest gap wedge is the 335i Sedan, a perfect fit between the solid, reasonably quick 328i and the hell-for-leather M3. With a nice round 300 bhp and a like amount of torque from 2979 cc, it falls squarely between the 3 Series bookends (whose respective outputs are 230 bhp and most likely 400 bhp for the upcoming V-8-powered M3). And acceleration-wise, this latest sedan isn't far off the recently departed E46-body M3…our test subject clicked off a fleet 5.0-second trip to 60 mph, ripping through the quarter mile in 13.5. That's a fair fight with a Cadillac CTS-V.

More impressive than the actual numbers is the consummate ease with which this inline-6-powered BMW achieves them. The first forced-induction small BMW in the U.S. ever (the 2002 Turbo of 1973-1974 was never officially imported), the 335i uses tiny, low-inertia twin turbos working in parallel for the most lag-free acceleration and response we've ever experienced. With BMW's double VANOS adjustable timing for both camshafts, the near-instantaneous boost and a relatively high compression ratio of 10.2:1, that 300 lb.-ft. of torque is on tap from 1400-5000 rpm. “Ample bottom-end torque,” said one staffer, “yet dip into the throttle and it really comes alive, zinging to redline.”

Higher cylinder pressures demanded some extra strength, so instead of the 328i's N52 magnesium-clad aluminum block, the 335i's N54 block is straight-up aluminum alloy with cast-iron cylinder liners. It also employs the high-pressure, direct-injection fuel system first used on the BMW 760's V-12 engine, with piezoelectric injectors mounted centrally in the combustion chambers. This location allows for a nice uniform cone of atomized fuel, ideal for power, efficiency and cylinder cooling. The sturdier block, turbos, intercooler, piping, etc., do bump the N54's overall weight to 419 lb., 62 lb. more than the N52's, but BMW reckons a 4.0-liter normally aspirated V-8 making the same power would carry an additional 150-lb. penalty.

Many an excellent powerplant has been tainted by a clumsy shift linkage or other drivetrain annoyance, but the BMW gets high marks all the way back to the rear tires' contact patches. Clutch take-up is easily modulated; the ZF 6-speed manual's gear lever jinks precisely from gate to gate with a touch of trademark notchiness; and revs don't stay artificially high between upshifts. Drive this BMW hard with both its standard traction- and stability-control systems defeated, and one small fly emerges from the ointment-the inside rear tire can spin, owing to the open differential. It does take a lot of throttle, steering lock and lateral g-forces at once to invoke.

Small aberration aside, this chassis devours what the engine puts out, then asks, “May I have another?” Our test car had the optional Sport Package, with 18-in. wheels and Bridgestone Potenza RE 050A run-flat tires, with section widths staggered 225 front, 255 rear. Spring and shock rates are tautened accordingly, acting on a MacPherson-strut front suspension (worth a peek on hands and knees to see the slender aluminum lower links) and a multilink setup at the rear. Ultimate grip is a satisfying 0.90g, and the steering lives up to BMW's deserved reputation: it's alive right off center, effort ramps up in a natural way, and a finely measured amount of high-frequency vibration reaches your fingertips.

Handling precision is lost if the car's structure flexes too much as the “fifth spring,” and you can tell with the first door-slam kerchunk that this is one sturdily built piece. And it should be, as smallish openings for the rear doors and trunk, and rocker-panel sills that seem an inch higher than the competitors' are friends of structural rigidity. Throw it into your favorite slightly cambered, decreasing-radius curve, and these concessions seem petty. Steady-state understeer is minimal, mid-corner bumps don't upset the car's trajectory, and there are no surprises as you push harder and harder. It's the consistency of composure throughout the 335i's broad handling envelope that keeps the BMW faithful coming back for more.

Want to tighten your line? Jumping off the throttle with the chassis highly loaded is never recommended, but the BMW responds with lessened understeer and slight rotation, those big 255-width rear Potenzas anchoring the tail and limiting your countersteer efforts to only a few degrees. Or scrub off speed for those pesky hairpins or cloverleaf entries? Stopping distances are better than most, with 1-piston sliding calipers squeezing their pads onto generously sized vented rotors: 13.7 in. front and 13.2 in. rear. Pedal feel is firm with little slop, consistent with the other controls. Anti-lock is standard; and one novel feature is fade compensation that automatically applies the brakes harder as they lose effectiveness, with no increase in pedal pressure.

BMW manages this handling with ride comfort that's firm but in no way harsh, and with very little road noise considering the aggressiveness of the tires. And you can enjoy it in an interior that's not overly computerized. The dash is serious and sporty, adopting the broad, convex curve of the 7 Series from door panel to door panel. Gauges are plain, the speedometer cluttered with its dual mile/kilometer scales crowding each other. At least there's a nice oil-temperature gauge inset in the tach, instead of the useless “instant mpg” needle. Although wood trim is optional, our 335i had the “Galvanic” metal trim, which as the name suggests, has metal galvanically applied to plastic in several layers, then topped with a clear coat.

It's easy to get comfortable. The thickly padded 3-spoke steering wheel manually tilts and telescopes. A sturdy dead pedal as wide as your shoe is much appreciated. Controls for the dual-zone climate system and radio are straightforward knobs and buttons, with beady orange/red displays that match the instrument illumination. Front seats with adjustable side bolsters (also part of the Sport Package) are supportive in all the right places, and rear seats are a good, if slightly cramped, place to give a couple of adult friends a lift across town. For serious mileage four-up, take the Caprice.

And then there's the whole styling thing. Many on staff feel the 3 Series is the best-looking of all modern BMWs. Perhaps the “flame-surfaced” excesses of the 7 and 5 Series have cooled down to glowing embers in the 3. Less is certainly more here; it looks striking and nicely chiseled from every angle, although the big round exhaust tips frenched into the valance look more Japanese than German.

In all, the 335i Sedan is a pretty sweet package, starting at $39,395, that could set off a new era of turbocharged performance for BMW. Let's hope the Bavarian automaker doesn't repeat the mistake of that forced-induction 2002 of the early 1970s: It had reverse-type “Turbo” graphics on its front spoiler, designed to be read in the rearview mirrors of the car ahead. It's far better to have the turbos underhood, unannounced, quietly making power.
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