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BMW 3-Series (E90 E92) Forum > BMW E90/E92/E93 3-series General Forums > Regional Forums > UK > 325D brakes, your opinion please.



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      03-14-2013, 08:14 AM   #23
M-dieseltouring
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ade146 View Post
I think everyone is missing the point. The car doesnt know how many miles are left on the pads.
Or if it does; Why the big differense between front and rear brakes?

It should be the other way around?
As front brakes are much more "in use" than the rear brakes...
I mean if the front and rear brakes are equally worn the car would give the rear ones more milage as they wear slower than the front ones. If you understand what I mean?...

This became a bit messy...
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      03-14-2013, 04:32 PM   #24
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I cant answer that Im sorry. I guess it is the way they programmed the count down timers. Not well it seems. I can tell you there is nothing there to measure wear only the usual disc contacts that all cars have.
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      03-16-2013, 02:38 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M-dieseltouring View Post
...I do not agree in that the DSC is causing the problem.
The DSC only comes into action if one starts to go sideways, and brakes every wheel separately.
If applying only rear brakes one need not to be a rocket scientist to predict what's going to happen next...

The traction control-part of the system is not connected to the brakes at all. It just decreases enginepower, and you see the yellow sign blink right in front of you.
I think you are mistaken on this. The brakes are used are all sorts of things; Anti-lock, stability control and for the rear brakes only - various levels of traction control. Also engine management is also applied at times.

You only have to give it some beans and get the orange light flashing and then go feel and smell the rear brakes. The diesels have so much torque that wheel spin occurs very easily; especially when turning out of a junction in the wet and with cold summer run flats.
My rear pads went after 25K miles.

DTC is not a single thing but a combination of traction control, stability control and engine management - all controlled by computer to keep the car within certain limits.

Thus DTC and simple traction control systems (stopping a wheel spinning via the brakes only) are not the same.

From BMW:
Dynamic Traction Control (DTC).
Dynamic Traction Control (DTC) allows more wheel slip and thus a more dynamic driving style with higher wheel traction and DSC controlling stability. A small amount of spin on the drive wheels improves traction when pulling off from a standstill in snow or on loose terrain.

Dynamic Traction Control (DTC) is a sub-function of the Dynamic Stability Control (DSC) system that can be turned on and off. DTC has two major roles: to regulate traction and to enable sports-style driving while providing active stability control.
When the drive wheels start losing traction the DSC automatically begins stabilisation measures. The Dynamic Stability Control system curbs the engine output and stops slip on the wheels. In exceptional situations, however, a small amount of wheel slip can be an advantage.

When driving in deep snow, slush or on loose terrain a small amount of wheel spin improves traction. For these occasions, as well as those when the drivers want a sportier driving style, the DTC can be activated by pressing a button and this allows more slip and reduces the DSCís curbing of the engine. The result: better traction and more thrust.

The DTC also makes driving on snow and ice-free roads more dynamic. When activated, the DTC allows sporty drivers more room to manoeuvre around curves than the Dynamic Stability Control and even permits controlled drifts. The driver retains complete control over the vehicle in every situation and the Dynamic Stability Controlís stabilising measures remain active even when the DTC is activated.
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      03-20-2013, 07:30 PM   #26
M-dieseltouring
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Ok?
I feel it differently on my car (as well as on my stepmothers and other similar BMWs), as when "all systems are active" one can floor it on snow in low gears and provoke it as much as you can and nothing dramatic will happen.
I can't feel any breaking, just reduction of power.
No smell.

Anyway, the first thing to do in winter or in wet conditions is to press the button for so long that all systems are deactivated.
It is hopeless to overtake other cars as the systems are oversensitive in my opinion, and takes power down and makes one stay in "overtaking position" for far too long...

I don't totally agree with BMW in all they write either:
"A small amount of spin on the drive wheels improves traction when pulling off from a standstill in snow or on loose terrain."
Yeah, well in snow at about 0 degrees celsius you make a polished surface called ice if you start with wheelspin. Even if it is just "a small amount", so this is bull...

P.S. You wrote "Thus DTC and simple traction control systems (stopping a wheel spinning via the brakes only) are not the same."
I had an E39 525tds some years ago, and the DTC (it was called DTC in -97 too) ruined every attempt to climb the hill up to where I live as it took engine power down, it lost turbopressure and thereby torque, the engine took time to build pressure again, same thing happened again and again until the rpm came under "point of creating pressure"... (This was in 2nd gear, and 1st is too direct to get any grip)
If the system had engaged the brakes I would have kept the pressure...

But this is now history as the Italians gave salvation to the world of diesel-engines, named Common Rail...

Last edited by M-dieseltouring; 03-20-2013 at 07:47 PM.
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