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BMW 3-Series (E90 E92) Forum > E90 / E92 / E93 3-series Technical Forums > DIY Guides > DIY Water Pump & Thermostat Replacement (2007 335i w/Automatic Transmission)



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Built My Way's Avatar DIY Water Pump & Thermostat Replacement (2007 335i w/Automatic Transmission)
Built My Way
12-23-2012
DIY Water Pump & Thermostat Replacement (2007 335i w/Automatic Transmission) NOTE: This DIY may be used on other 335i model years and on xi models as well (part numbers may differ).

UPDATE (Feb 16, 2014): BavAuto has put together a great video of the procedure which can...
  #22  
By MPower_PR on 02-16-2013, 10:39 PM
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Thank you!!!

I did change my weter pump and thermostat today...spend only $265.00 for both (great deal from Canada) plus $25.00 in a gallon of coolant...it was pretty simple with your tutorial and the only two hassle was taking off the small hose that is hold with a clamp and re-installing the front clip hose on the thermostat...other than that it was simple...

Also not sure if you post it...there is a step to follow at the end to get the air out of the system plus checking for leaks and make sure your new pump is working:

1. fill reservoir with 50/50 mix of coolant to the top
2. key on
3. both heather on HI, fan speed 1
4. press gas pedal for 10 secs.

This will run your pump and circulate the hole system for 12 mins. (make sure your batt. is good or connect to charger). Repeat process 3times paying attention to the reservoir to make sure it doesn't run dry.



This wi
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  #23  
By woodpecka on 02-19-2013, 12:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MPower_PR View Post
I did change my weter pump and thermostat today...spend only $265.00 for both (great deal from Canada) plus $25.00 in a gallon of coolant...it was pretty simple with your tutorial and the only two hassle was taking off the small hose that is hold with a clamp and re-installing the front clip hose on the thermostat...other than that it was simple...

Also not sure if you post it...there is a step to follow at the end to get the air out of the system plus checking for leaks and make sure your new pump is working:

1. fill reservoir with 50/50 mix of coolant to the top
2. key on
3. both heather on HI, fan speed 1
4. press gas pedal for 10 secs.

This will run your pump and circulate the hole system for 12 mins. (make sure your batt. is good or connect to charger). Repeat process 3times paying attention to the reservoir to make sure it doesn't run dry.



This wi
Where did you buy the pump from?
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  #24  
By SLBimmer on 02-20-2013, 02:34 PM
so if I understand correctly, this will cost around $500 and 5-7 hours labor?
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  #25  
By Built My Way on 02-20-2013, 04:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SLBimmer View Post
so if I understand correctly, this will cost around $500 and 5-7 hours labor?
Parts were $580 from BavAuto. You'll probably do better time wise though.
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  #26  
By foghat on 02-21-2013, 08:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MPower_PR View Post
I did change my weter pump and thermostat today...spend only $265.00 for both (great deal from Canada) plus $25.00 in a gallon of coolant...it was pretty simple with your tutorial and the only two hassle was taking off the small hose that is hold with a clamp and re-installing the front clip hose on the thermostat...other than that it was simple...
Where did you buy the pump from? Did it include the thermostat?
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  #27  
By Pr0metheus on 02-26-2013, 05:22 PM
I am about to do this on an 06 330i and was wondering if you guys recommend doing preventative maintenance on any of the related hoses, even if they do not appear to "need" replacing.

Traditionally when doing a thermostat I replace all hoses going to and from it, but then again i've never had a car with an electric coolant pump (or nearly as awesome as my E90).

Any ideas/suggestions/personal experience welcome.
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  #28  
By Built My Way on 02-27-2013, 09:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pr0metheus View Post
I am about to do this on an 06 330i and was wondering if you guys recommend doing preventative maintenance on any of the related hoses, even if they do not appear to "need" replacing.

Traditionally when doing a thermostat I replace all hoses going to and from it, but then again i've never had a car with an electric coolant pump (or nearly as awesome as my E90).

Any ideas/suggestions/personal experience welcome.
I didn't change out any hoses when doing mine. I guess I have to draw the line somewhere otherwise there'd be no end to it. Actually my hoses were in good shape.
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  #29  
By nc1mike on 03-23-2013, 09:23 PM
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water pump thermostat r/r

I can't thank the author enough for the great DIY .

A few details 03/2007 build e90 335i 98,500miles. The water pump and thermostat are factory originals. The pump is a BMW / Siemens VDO and the thermostat is BMW /Wahler.

My saga started today Saturday, started the car and the fan went full power but no (ses) light sevice engine soon or codes. Went out and made it about a mile before the car got hot and reduced power. Made it back home and then realized the pump was making noise and the car did indeed get very hot...... Placed an order for the parts through ECS tuning with next day air shipping , still $400 cheaper than the local dealership just for parts... hopefully I'll get the parts by Tuesday.

I've been working on cars for 35yrs and this was a tough one. I had the hardest time removing the coolant hoses from the thermostat. Working on your back with the car on ramps, not easy..It's hard to see what going on. Total time 2.5hrs just for removal.. probably another 2.5-3.00 hrs to get it back together..
Last edited by nc1mike; 03-23-2013 at 10:06 PM.
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  #30  
By woodpecka on 03-23-2013, 10:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nc1mike
I can't than the author enough for the great DIY.
My saga started today Saturday, started the car and the fan went full power but no ses light or codes. Went out and made it about a mile before the car got hot and reduced power. Made it back home and then realized the pump was making noise and the car did indeed get very hot...... Placed an order for the parts through ECS tuning with next day air shipping , still $400 cheaper than the local stealership just for parts... hopefully I'll get the parts by Tuesday

I've been working on cars for 35yr and this was a tough one. I had the hardest time removing the coolant hoses from the thermostat. Working on your back with the car on ramps, not easy.. Total time 2.5hrs just for removal.. probably another 2.5-3.00 hrs to get it back together..
How many miles?
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  #31  
By nc1mike on 03-23-2013, 10:07 PM
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I just updated the original post but to answer you 98,500 miles. These are original parts.
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  #32  
By AVL39 on 03-23-2013, 10:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MPower_PR View Post
I did change my weter pump and thermostat today...spend only $265.00 for both (great deal from Canada) plus $25.00 in a gallon of coolant...

N54 prices?
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  #33  
By kluski on 03-24-2013, 09:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pr0metheus View Post

Any ideas/suggestions/personal experience welcome.
I would like to say thanks for the DIY, this helped me. I thought I could add a comment or two (I have a 2006 330XI):

1. Taking off the passenger side wheel well plastic helped tremendously. So much so, it made getting the third/top bolt out the easiest of the three.

2. For me, removing the steering coolant hose anchor was the hardest part. It was even harder to get the bolt back in. I could not see the area and it was very small, even for my small fingers. I kept dropping the bolt trying to find the hole.

3. I found an inexpensive scanner to clear the code. BMWhat was about $50 and allowed me to clear the necessary pump code before replacing it. That was cheaper than other tools I have seen around.

4. Tischer had great prices (under $500 for the pump/t-stat/bolt kit with shipping).

All in all, it was not a complex job, just lots of parts to remove and sore muscle from stretching.
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  #34  
By nc1mike on 03-26-2013, 05:46 PM
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aluminum bolts

See my post #29
My parts came this morning from ECS Tuning , very happy with the service and the parts $602 total for h20 pump, thermostat, 1 gal of coolant, replacement bolts and $81.74 for next day air...

A note of caution: The replacement pump was just like the author's and has with no vibration isolators. The issue is the mounting flanges are shorter (less thick) so now top bolt now bottoms out before the pump is snugged up to the engine block. Its not very loose maybe a thread or so, but the bolt does bottom out. The fix is to cut 1/8" of the bolt that goes into the top position. use a Dremel or what have you I used a hacksaw. If you trim it before hand it will save you some frustration.

I also took the time to clean my intercooler both inside and out. For the inside I first drained out about 2 tablespoons of oil. Then used good ol' gasoline, maybe a cups worth and let it sit then swished it around , repeat. Then I followed it up with liberal does of simple green and water to remove the last of the residue. I let it sit on end to drain. For the outside simple green and high pressure water. The intercooler looks like new, hopefully it will perform better too.
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  #35  
By Built My Way on 03-27-2013, 02:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kluski View Post
I would like to say thanks for the DIY, this helped me. I thought I could add a comment or two (I have a 2006 330XI):

1. Taking off the passenger side wheel well plastic helped tremendously. So much so, it made getting the third/top bolt out the easiest of the three.

2. For me, removing the steering coolant hose anchor was the hardest part. It was even harder to get the bolt back in. I could not see the area and it was very small, even for my small fingers. I kept dropping the bolt trying to find the hole.

3. I found an inexpensive scanner to clear the code. BMWhat was about $50 and allowed me to clear the necessary pump code before replacing it. That was cheaper than other tools I have seen around.

4. Tischer had great prices (under $500 for the pump/t-stat/bolt kit with shipping).

All in all, it was not a complex job, just lots of parts to remove and sore muscle from stretching.
You are so right about that coolant hose anchor bolt. It was a devil of a thing to get back in. The job is fairly straight forward though and no special tools per se. Glad it worked out for you.
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  #36  
By Built My Way on 03-27-2013, 02:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nc1mike View Post
See my post #29
My parts came this morning from ECS Tuning , very happy with the service and the parts $602 total for h20 pump, thermostat, 1 gal of coolant, replacement bolts and $81.74 for next day air...

A note of caution: The replacement pump was just like the author's and has with no vibration isolators. The issue is the mounting flanges are shorter (less thick) so now top bolt now bottoms out before the pump is snugged up to the engine block. Its not very loose maybe a thread or so, but the bolt does bottom out. The fix is to cut 1/8" of the bolt that goes into the top position. use a Dremel or what have you I used a hacksaw. If you trim it before hand it will save you some frustration.

I also took the time to clean my intercooler both inside and out. For the inside I first drained out about 2 tablespoons of oil. Then used good ol' gasoline, maybe a cups worth and let it sit then swished it around , repeat. Then I followed it up with liberal does of simple green and water to remove the last of the residue. I let it sit on end to drain. For the outside simple green and high pressure water. The intercooler looks like new, hopefully it will perform better too.
Too bad about them shipping the wrong length bolts. I'm sure many people are running into this issue and end up wasting time waiting for the proper bolts to be shipped. If you don't mind, I'm going to add your comment about cutting the bolts to the bold print pre-procedure notes.
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  #37  
By deadmn1337 on 03-28-2013, 06:21 PM
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hey guys, doing this install on Saturday just want to make sure i have the right parts.

Picked up the following
11-53-7-549-476 Thermostat
11-51-7-632-426 Water Pump
11-51-0-392-553 Bolts

I dont have a metric ruler at the moment so I can't check the length of the bolts until tomorrow when I get to work.
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  #38  
By Built My Way on 03-29-2013, 04:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deadmn1337 View Post
hey guys, doing this install on Saturday just want to make sure i have the right parts.

Picked up the following
11-53-7-549-476 Thermostat
11-51-7-632-426 Water Pump
11-51-0-392-553 Bolts

I dont have a metric ruler at the moment so I can't check the length of the bolts until tomorrow when I get to work.
Thermostat is OK. The pump is the latest and takes the shorter bolts. Looks like you were shipped the longer bolts though. Make sure you measure. They are aluminum and can easily be ground or cut to shorten. The top bolt seems to be the only trouble maker but you may want to trim the other two as well. nc1mike cut his top bolt shorter by an eighth of an inch. Remember, you can only use the bolts once.
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  #39  
By deadmn1337 on 03-29-2013, 03:06 PM
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well checked the bolts, definately the wrong ones. Call the parts guy and he had to do some research to find the correct ones cuz when the pump was superseded they didnt update the part number for the bolts. When i pick the correct ones up ill post the part number so everyone will know which ones to get.
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  #40  
By Built My Way on 03-30-2013, 05:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deadmn1337 View Post
well checked the bolts, definately the wrong ones. Call the parts guy and he had to do some research to find the correct ones cuz when the pump was superseded they didnt update the part number for the bolts. When i pick the correct ones up ill post the part number so everyone will know which ones to get.
The bolt p/n is already in the pre-procedure write up.
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  #41  
By ellipsis212 on 04-01-2013, 11:59 AM
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Just did this job over the weekend and wanted to say a big THANKS to the OP for this DIY. It helped out a lot. There's also a word doc floating around with very specific step by step that was also posted up on the board. It took me a total of 7 hours over 3 days during my kids' naps or after bed, and if I had to do it again I think I could do it all in under 3 hours. It was not as hard as I thought it would be, but I was prepared for the worst so maybe that colored my view.

Here are a couple extra pointers I wanted to make/reiterate:

1. You don't have to take off the radiator fan as the aforementioned doc suggests. It wouldn't hurt but there was plenty of clearance without it. I didn't need to remove any panels other than the underbody splash guards, which are obviously necessary.

2. The correct tool for removing the top water pump bolt is the following combination: E12 > universal > 6" ext > 3/8 ratchet. I feared this bolt but it was no problem with that tool setup.

3. The BMW type hose couplings on the front of the t-stat have those clips that need to be lifted to take them on/off. They actually need to be lifted about a 1/2" to release so don't think you're free and clear just b/c you popped it up 2mm. There are catches to prevent the clip from flying away and a pick tool is really helpful for releasing them. Oh also, you can get to them more easily from above than you can below. In fact, while you're up there, there's a hose right near the radiator that uses the same clip so you can get a good visual on its function before you start messing around where you can't see.

4. You will get a coolant bath.

5. It's a good idea to have a replacement radiator drain plug on hand. ECS has them for like $2.

6. When reinstalling the t-stat it goes up between the radiator and the cross member, NOT aft of the water pump. Move the unattached hoses out of your way. I somehow removed the old t-stat in that space but the new one would not go in the same way...larger flanges I think.

Overall, it was a tedious job but it's very doable for the home DIYer. Considering that I was quoted between $1500-2000 from area BMW dealers/techs I would take the $600 in parts and tools any day!
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  #42  
By dhc905 on 04-01-2013, 03:06 PM
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For anyone not inclined to do this - I bought the parts here for a total of 325$ shipped and paid my independent mechanic 280 to do the install + 22 for BMW coolant. I think you can find people to do it for around 300-350 all day long...
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  #43  
By woodpecka on 04-01-2013, 03:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ellipsis212
Just did this job over the weekend and wanted to say a big THANKS to the OP for this DIY. It helped out a lot. There's also a word doc floating around with very specific step by step that was also posted up on the board. It took me a total of 7 hours over 3 days during my kids' naps or after bed, and if I had to do it again I think I could do it all in under 3 hours. It was not as hard as I thought it would be, but I was prepared for the worst so maybe that colored my view.

Here are a couple extra pointers I wanted to make/reiterate:

1. You don't have to take off the radiator fan as the aforementioned doc suggests. It wouldn't hurt but there was plenty of clearance without it. I didn't need to remove any panels other than the underbody splash guards, which are obviously necessary.

2. The correct tool for removing the top water pump bolt is the following combination: E12 > universal > 6" ext > 3/8 ratchet. I feared this bolt but it was no problem with that tool setup.

3. The BMW type hose couplings on the front of the t-stat have those clips that need to be lifted to take them on/off. They actually need to be lifted about a 1/2" to release so don't think you're free and clear just b/c you popped it up 2mm. There are catches to prevent the clip from flying away and a pick tool is really helpful for releasing them. Oh also, you can get to them more easily from above than you can below. In fact, while you're up there, there's a hose right near the radiator that uses the same clip so you can get a good visual on its function before you start messing around where you can't see.

4. You will get a coolant bath.

5. It's a good idea to have a replacement radiator drain plug on hand. ECS has them for like $2.

6. When reinstalling the t-stat it goes up between the radiator and the cross member, NOT aft of the water pump. Move the unattached hoses out of your way. I somehow removed the old t-stat in that space but the new one would not go in the same way...larger flanges I think.

Overall, it was a tedious job but it's very doable for the home DIYer. Considering that I was quoted between $1500-2000 from area BMW dealers/techs I would take the $600 in parts and tools any day!
Nice info.

Can you post the word file?
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