E90Post
 


European Auto Source
 
BMW 3-Series (E90 E92) Forum > BMW E90/E92/E93 3-series General Forums > Regional Forums > Canada > Turning off car prior to car reaching proper operational temp- long run issues?



Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
      01-21-2013, 03:23 PM   #1
jacewong
Private First Class
Canada
1

 
Drives: e92 328i
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: markham


Posts: 160
iTrader: (0)

Turning off car prior to car reaching proper operational temp- long run issues?

Hello,

I have a question about turning off the car before the car reaches proper temperature. As I live about 1km from the gotrain and walking is not an option (don't ask ). Sometimes I have time to circle the area and run laps before I turn off the car, but not often.

I heard this is one of the worst things we can do to engines as the moisture (or carbon build up?) within the engine created don't have a chance to burn off and thus creates rust or issues within the engine.

Is this a legitiment concern with new engines, this being a thing of the past?

Last edited by jacewong; 01-21-2013 at 03:31 PM.
Appreciate 0
      01-21-2013, 05:42 PM   #2
vtec96
Second Lieutenant
Canada
2

 
vtec96's Avatar
 
Drives: E89
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Canada


Posts: 282
iTrader: (2)

I am on the same boat.....
__________________
CURRENT: 2009 E89 35i
Dinan Stage 2
PAST: 2008 E92 335xi
Appreciate 0
      01-21-2013, 08:42 PM   #3
shaginwagon13
Charted Accountant
Canada
9

 
shaginwagon13's Avatar
 
Drives: BMW 335i Coupe
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Toronto


Posts: 910
iTrader: (4)

I'm going to tag along as well to this question.

I know that if your ripping it and you turn your car off right away you destroy your turbos because they don't have a chance to cool down they basically stop and fry themself.
Appreciate 0
      01-21-2013, 09:34 PM   #4
Modded328FTW
Private First Class
1

 
Drives: 328
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Canada


Posts: 106
iTrader: (0)

Not a bad idea to do a long drive about once a week to burn off excess moisture in the engine.

I used to commute 5 mins to a go train everyday, but I would do a nice drive 1 a week to stretch the cars legs and burn off any moisture.
Appreciate 0
      01-22-2013, 09:04 AM   #5
335BBS
Brigadier General
Canada
36

 
Drives: 2009 335 coupe.
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Toronto, Ontario


Posts: 3,607
iTrader: (0)

Quote:
Originally Posted by jacewong View Post
Hello,

I have a question about turning off the car before the car reaches proper temperature. As I live about 1km from the gotrain and walking is not an option (don't ask ). Sometimes I have time to circle the area and run laps before I turn off the car, but not often.

I heard this is one of the worst things we can do to engines as the moisture (or carbon build up?) within the engine created don't have a chance to burn off and thus creates rust or issues within the engine.

Is this a legitiment concern with new engines, this being a thing of the past?
If this is all the car ever does you may have a problem with exhaust (moisture build up) but Nothing serious in engine. You need to get it up to temp to dry it out every now and then.

Quote:
Originally Posted by shaginwagon13 View Post
I'm going to tag along as well to this question.

I know that if your ripping it and you turn your car off right away you destroy your turbos because they don't have a chance to cool down they basically stop and fry themself.
In theory thats a slight possibility butt you cant take everything you read literally. If that was the case there would be fried turbos everywhere. They get cooled...I've never heard of this happening to anyone.
Appreciate 0
      01-23-2013, 01:51 AM   #6
QBall28
New Member
Canada
0

 
Drives: 2007 BMW 335I
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Vancouver B.C.


Posts: 17
iTrader: (0)

I had a 2002 BMW 325i that i drove for a very short commute time in -20c to 0c. That resulted in a $2000 repair bill for a $70 dollar part.

To keep it short, as your engine warms it creates condensation = (cold block + combustion heat). When you reach optimal operating temperature, a valve opens PCV or CCV in a BMW and allows this moisture to be circulated into the combustion chamber, Viola no moisture in your oil.

But when you don't reach optimal temperature each time your creating moisture in the motor and engine oil. Since oil change intervals are so long you get a high moisture content. When that moisture surrounds a rubber membrane = CCV valve and freezes it tears and clogs that valve.

Go to e46 look up CCV valve, so look under your engine oil cap white film = moisture!
Appreciate 0
      01-23-2013, 10:36 AM   #7
BMWWW
Private First Class
1

 
BMWWW's Avatar
 
Drives: BMW
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Toronto


Posts: 175
iTrader: (2)

Quote:
Originally Posted by 335BBS View Post
If this is all the car ever does you may have a problem with exhaust (moisture build up) but Nothing serious in engine. You need to get it up to temp to dry it out every now and then.


In theory thats a slight possibility butt you cant take everything you read literally. If that was the case there would be fried turbos everywhere. They get cooled...I've never heard of this happening to anyone.
The reason why there are turbo timers are because if you drive spirited, and then shut off the car right away, the oil in oil-cooled turbos will just boil and cook. Turbo timers keep the engine running, and keep the oil circulating to get a chance to cool down sufficiently. I'm not scientist, I don't have a thermostat hooked up to the oil temps, but it's always good practice (certainly with older turbo'ed cars), to lay off the go pedal a few minutes before reaching your destination/sit in your car while checking your phone.
__________________

When called an idiot sometimes is better to be quiet than to open mouth and remove all doubt.
Man who walk through airport turnstile sideways going to Bangkok.
--Confucius

Appreciate 0
      01-23-2013, 11:32 AM   #8
jacewong
Private First Class
Canada
1

 
Drives: e92 328i
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: markham


Posts: 160
iTrader: (0)

shieetttt.. thanks for the info!
what is proper opt tempt? 110 degrees? takes me like 20mins to hit that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by QBall28 View Post
I had a 2002 BMW 325i that i drove for a very short commute time in -20c to 0c. That resulted in a $2000 repair bill for a $70 dollar part.

To keep it short, as your engine warms it creates condensation = (cold block + combustion heat). When you reach optimal operating temperature, a valve opens PCV or CCV in a BMW and allows this moisture to be circulated into the combustion chamber, Viola no moisture in your oil.

But when you don't reach optimal temperature each time your creating moisture in the motor and engine oil. Since oil change intervals are so long you get a high moisture content. When that moisture surrounds a rubber membrane = CCV valve and freezes it tears and clogs that valve.

Go to e46 look up CCV valve, so look under your engine oil cap white film = moisture!
Appreciate 0
      01-23-2013, 12:21 PM   #9
Pierce330
Private First Class
Canada
1

 
Pierce330's Avatar
 
Drives: E90 328 xDrive
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Oakville


Posts: 121
iTrader: (0)

I think that this question came up somewhere else on this forum as well. I am in the same boat, I drive 2.2 km to get to work. However, I take a longer 15-20 km drive on the way home everyday. But, I do idle in the Tim Horton's drive through line in the morning, so my 325 does reach normal operating temperature. Regardless, short, cold trips are not well received from our cars
__________________
E46 330i (Sold)
E90 328i (Sold)
E90 325i (Sold)
E90 328i xDrive
Appreciate 0
      01-23-2013, 12:22 PM   #10
Devas
Second Lieutenant
Canada
2

 
Drives: 2011 E90 M3 / 2012 F30 335i
Join Date: May 2010
Location: York Region


Posts: 270
iTrader: (1)

I reach 50 degrees oil temp after 20 mins of driving conservatively, especially in this recent weather
__________________
COBB AP | ETS FMIC | ETS DownPipe | ETS ChargePipe | Gruppe M Ram Air Intake System | Bilstein PSS10 Coil-Over Kit | HRE P40
Appreciate 0
      01-23-2013, 03:42 PM   #11
335BBS
Brigadier General
Canada
36

 
Drives: 2009 335 coupe.
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Toronto, Ontario


Posts: 3,607
iTrader: (0)

Quote:
Originally Posted by BMWWW View Post
The reason why there are turbo timers are because if you drive spirited, and then shut off the car right away, the oil in oil-cooled turbos will just boil and cook. Turbo timers keep the engine running, and keep the oil circulating to get a chance to cool down sufficiently. I'm not scientist, I don't have a thermostat hooked up to the oil temps, but it's always good practice (certainly with older turbo'ed cars), to lay off the go pedal a few minutes before reaching your destination/sit in your car while checking your phone.
I know how they work. Have you ever heard of one seizing from overheating?
Appreciate 0
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:22 PM.




e90post
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
1Addicts.com, BIMMERPOST.com, E90Post.com, F30Post.com, M3Post.com, ZPost.com, 5Post.com, 6Post.com, 7Post.com, XBimmers.com logo and trademark are properties of BIMMERPOST