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      06-28-2016, 12:50 PM   #67
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Cue up that lame ass REM tune.

Soros got on the batphone.
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      06-28-2016, 07:05 PM   #68
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This is the best article I've read yet from a Brit's POV no matter what side you're on. The author goes A-Z,

http://tomewing.tumblr.com/post/1464...ounded-by-hail

Here's C:

C is for Calais: One of the things the Leave campaign was quiet about is the threat/promise of the Mayor of Calais to scrap the arrangement which lets the English border be, de facto, in France. When this happens, it’s going to change the immigration debate in fairly nightmarish ways. Little England was stricken with fear and loathing of migrants when refugee camps in Calais were bottlenecks caused by the French stopping people getting to Britain. What happens if a populist Mayor says “Not the EU’s problem any more” and waves them through? Bodies washing up at Bournemouth? Internment camps on the Isle of Wight? Racist vigilantism in UKIP’s coastal strongholds? I don’t know and neither do Leave, but it’s terrifying.

E:

E for Empire: The story of the referendum is the story of open psychic wounds — generational losses never quite atoned for which come back to haunt current decisions. Trying to explain the Baby Boomer’s preference for Brexit, most commentators have fallen back on the idea of the vanished Britain of their youth, which they feel might come back if we left the EU. This is a bit glib, I think. What motivates bitterness isn’t just nostalgia but a sense of wider loss. The Boomers grew up in a Britain which was simultaneously special — it had held the line against Fascism, won the war, and was now a young and lucky country — and also one that was losing power and influence at a vertiginous rate. British exceptionalism — the idea that Britain is uniquely plucky, favoured, etc. — is an Imperial myth, not a natural by-product of nationalism. The wrenching glorious win and enormous loss of the 40s to the 60s is the psychological root of exceptionalism, and of that strand in Brexit. We have never recovered from the Empire. But today the Brexiteers have got what they wanted: for a moment, Britain really matters.

And F:

F is for Far Right: The Far Right — and I’m happy to lump UKIP in here — make up a small part of the Leave coalition but obviously they’re a vocal part and they will do very well out of the referendum. They would have done just as well if Remain had won, though — around half of UKIP supporters believed attempts were being made to fix the vote, and a betrayal narrative would have taken off very quickly leading to a surge in UKIP support. (As it is the betrayal narrative will wait a bit — see Stab In The Back). A lot of people think Britain has some kind of natural inoculation against fascism — I hope it’s true, but I suspect we’ll see far right support jump from the 13% UKIP vote at the last election to something closer to the higher levels you see on the continent.
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      07-02-2016, 09:23 AM   #69
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cays View Post
I was reading it here this morning:

http://www.express.co.uk/news/politi...erstate-Brexit

European SUPERSTATE to be unveiled: EU nations 'to be morphed into one' post-Brexit

EUROPEAN political chiefs are to take advantage of Brexit by unveiling their long-held plan to morph the continent’s countries into one GIANT SUPERSTATE, it has emerged yesterday.

By NICK GUTTERIDGE
PUBLISHED: 02:01, Tue, Jun 28, 2016 | UPDATED: 12:28, Tue, Jun 28, 2016
Frank-Walter Steinmeier GETTY

German Angela Merkel met with European heads today at the EU summit. The foreign ministers of France and Germany are due to reveal a blueprint to effectively do away with individual member states in what is being described as an “ultimatum”.

Under the radical proposals EU countries will lose the right to have their own army, criminal law, taxation system or central bank, with all those powers being transferred to Brussels.

Controversially member states would also lose what few controls they have left over their own borders, including the procedure for admitting and relocating refugees.

The plot has sparked fury and panic in Poland - a traditional ally of Britain in the fight against federalism - after being leaked to Polish news channel TVP Info. Polish politicians say the plans include loss of control of a number of key policy areas

Polish foreign minister Witold Waszczykowski has blasted the plan. The public broadcaster reports that the bombshell proposal will be presented to a meeting of the Visegrad group of countries - made up of Poland, the Czech Republic, Hungary and Slovakia - by German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier later today.

Excerpts of the nine-page report were published today as the leaders of Germany, France and Italy met in Berlin for Brexit crisis talks.

In the preamble to the text the two ministers write: "Our countries share a common destiny and a common set of values that give rise to an even closer union between our citizens. We will therefore strive for a political union in Europe and invite the next Europeans to participate in this venture."

The revelations come just days after Britain shook the Brussels establishment by voting to leave the European Union in a move some have predicted could leave to the break-up of the EU.

A number of member states are deeply unhappy about the creeping federalism of the European project with anti-EU sentiments running high in eastern Europe, Scandinavia and France.
The Express is our version of the Enquirer, they still run headlines on princess Diana every week.
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      07-02-2016, 03:53 PM   #70
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This is DER SPIEGEL's take:

The grand European vision aspires to a federalist state. It envisions countries giving up their sovereignty and statehood step by step, ultimately to be ruled by Brussels as the United States of Europe. That is a nice dream, but it hasn't been able to force its way into the real world. The British were never adherents of this dream. They wanted a loose alliance promising economic advantages. Now, they don't want anything from the EU anymore. Other countries could follow. There are many in the Netherlands who are also hoping for a referendum. Many in Germany share this skepticism but know full well that, as a country relying on exports, Germany profits handsomely from the EU. They should also be aware that the process of European unification helped Germany travel the road from international pariah to being a valued and well-liked country.

Germany needs Europe and that's why it should do all it can to preserve the EU. Brexit may be a terrible event because the UK is such an important country with deeply rooted liberal and democratic values. But one doesn't need to worry about what will happen to the country now that it has left the EU. It will remain a democracy and will remain part of the West. Russia will not be able to drag Britain over to its side. One can't be so sure about other countries in Europe. Were Greece to leave the euro zone, it would seek support elsewhere.

Still, the opening statement of this piece holds true: Zero hour can represent a moment of liberation. Following Brexit, that means the following: We have not been successful in keeping Europe unified, which makes it no longer necessary to maintain the fiction of unity no matter what. The world now knows that the European construct is a fragile one. It is undeniable. But something can be won from this realization.

It is now possible to take a sober look at where unity is necessary and where it is not. That means letting go of the ideology which holds that all EU member states must advance at the same pace. Europe still needs a large number of people to be taken seriously on the global stage. But there can be different levels of unity.

For Germany, France remains its most important partner. Now that Britain is leaving, that partnership is even more important. Europe can only work if the German-French axis is halfway intact. Currently, it is not -- because France has fallen behind economically and can no longer credibly claim to be on equal footing. Germany must now help France and show political and economic solidarity. Best would be a plan for an even tighter political and economic association, with financial and security policy being the priorities.

The other European partners should be invited to participate, but they should only be allowed to participate if they are able. That means, if they meet certain standards. This could be the beginning of a core Europe, made up of those who are both willing and able to pull their weight. The others, of course, can remain in the EU, but must make the effort to reform their institutions and economies. Those who aren't able will fall behind. And this time, standards are standards. Cheating and forbearance of the kind seen with the euro zone accession criteria will not be tolerated.
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      07-08-2016, 03:38 AM   #71
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What do you think is going to be with property markets in the UK and the EU?
I believe in the slight fall of prices in England and Spain. Spain will suffer a wane of demand for real estate from British buyers who were extremely active in this market. And in London the weak pound will play its part to attract new foreign investors. A sad thing that common people will suffer at the end.
A good piece on the topic https://tranio.com/united-kingdom/ne...e-the-eu_5152/
"the real estate market in Britain may benefit from heightened foreign interest"
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      07-08-2016, 11:59 AM   #72
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It all depends on whether you view increases in house prices as a benefit.
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      09-14-2016, 08:42 PM   #73
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Maybe that while Brexit thing was a good idea? This is the head of the EU:

"At EU summits, Mr Juncker has become known for his jovial greetings of leaders that have included kissing their bald spots and slapping Hungarian prime minister Viktor Orban across the face and shouting "Hi Dictator."

"French journalist Jean Quatremer, who conducted the interview, said Mr Juncker glugged four glasses of champagne during the course of their light lunch."

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...ing-drunk.html
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      10-07-2016, 08:19 AM   #74
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I am worried about property prices in London after Brexit. KPMG predicted that prices would drop by 5% nationally. But the contrary happened. The weak pound attracted foreign investors and now we enjoy even higher prices.
And the interest rate drop makes it worse. Now you can buy a luxury villa in Spain for the same money as a midget basement flat, just go to any estate agency's website. The cheapest apartment in London is threefold as expensive as one in Barcelona (Barcelona https://tranio.com/spain/catalonia/barcelona/ , London https://tranio.com/united-kingdom/london/)
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      10-07-2016, 08:38 AM   #75
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraPalmer View Post
I am worried about property prices in London after Brexit. KPMG predicted that prices would drop by 5% nationally. But the contrary happened. The weak pound attracted foreign investors and now we enjoy even higher prices.
And the interest rate drop makes it worse. Now you can buy a luxury villa in Spain for the same money as a midget basement flat, just go to any estate agency's website. The cheapest apartment in London is threefold as expensive as one in Barcelona (Barcelona https://tranio.com/spain/catalonia/barcelona/ , London https://tranio.com/united-kingdom/london/)
Be a hell of a commute though.
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