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      05-04-2016, 03:27 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Velocity26 View Post
OP's DIY is great, thanks.

After completing the job, I would offer a few comments to anyone else thinking about the job:

+Removing the Intake manifold is not required. I removed the throttle body completely (gave it a good cleaning while it was out) and could reach everything without regrets.

+The black electrical junction box slides off the holder, it just needs some persuasion.

+You do not need to remove the bolts supporting the fuel lines, at most you might need to loosen them, if that. Loosening the lower line support bolt requires a special Torx socket that is otherwise not needed.

All in all, not a terrible job, just a lot of small details that need to be checked.
Velocity,
Pretty sure my HPFP is failing on me. I believe you have the n54 like I do. What issue did you have to determine it was the HPFP failing? Also, where did you buy your replacement and at what cost?

My 2007 is now at 205K miles. Yes, I drive her a lot! I had 1 HPFP replaced under CPO around 115k. Yesterday, my car literally just died on me when driving. Restarted with half engine and SES light. I pulled codes but then immediately (and accidentally) deleted them. But just before, I believe I saw a HPFP error code.

Anyway, thanks in advance for any responses and thank you for the DIY!
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      05-04-2016, 03:41 PM   #24
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I use a Cobb tune, that allows me to log the fuel pressure requested and the fuel pressure supplied. When I would start the car, after sitting for a day or two, it would take several seconds for the NPFP to start building pressure. At the end it would require that I start the car several times before it would build pressure. It would also not be able to meet the pressure requested at high boost at higher RPM, sometimes it was 1,000psi below requested. If you have a way to monitor your rail pressure, you can see it failing.
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      06-21-2016, 10:12 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dbjb View Post
Velocity,
Pretty sure my HPFP is failing on me. I believe you have the n54 like I do. What issue did you have to determine it was the HPFP failing? Also, where did you buy your replacement and at what cost?

My 2007 is now at 205K miles. Yes, I drive her a lot! I had 1 HPFP replaced under CPO around 115k. Yesterday, my car literally just died on me when driving. Restarted with half engine and SES light. I pulled codes but then immediately (and accidentally) deleted them. But just before, I believe I saw a HPFP error code.

Anyway, thanks in advance for any responses and thank you for the DIY!
I just did this myself.... some of the symptoms I havent seen documented is extremely rough idles on start-up. Also once you hit limp mode the engine fan goes on full blast!
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      06-21-2016, 08:42 PM   #26
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Yep. ^^^

I changed my pump for $410. Been smooth ever since
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      06-27-2016, 12:41 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dbjb View Post
Yep. ^^^

I changed my pump for $410. Been smooth ever since

Can you please let me know where you changed and if you changed by yourself
where did you buy it from ?

Thanks!
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      06-27-2016, 12:48 PM   #28
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I purchased mine from the dealer and installed it myself.
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      06-30-2016, 03:55 PM   #29
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I purchased mine from E europarts .com and followed the DIY. Wasn't too bad and loads more comfortable than downpipes.
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      07-02-2016, 09:45 PM   #30
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If only there were a DIY like this for replacing a power steering pump...
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      07-29-2016, 07:54 PM   #31
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I do have a question.... does anyone suggest replacing the fuel line that connects to the hpfp? I replaced the hpfp and my lpfp and still get a 2fdb shadow code for hpfp at start-up somewhat of a rough idle then it calms down.
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      07-29-2016, 07:55 PM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bogdanm View Post
Can you please let me know where you changed and if you changed by yourself
where did you buy it from ?

Thanks!
I got mine from towson BMW there is a core charge so you get some money back however it is not cheap.
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      11-20-2016, 01:28 PM   #33
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This Job is easy on an N55.

Didn't hav to remove Intake Manifold. Had the pump off witching 45 mins.

Pity one can't refurb these things.
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      07-10-2017, 02:46 AM   #34
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Slight thread revival but I am looking into this as I experienced a long crank this morning. No rough idle, misfires or CEL (yet) but want to know what I am in for.

Any other advice other than what's already in this thread? The how-to is so well detailed it makes it look easy! I know that wont be the case lol.
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      03-09-2018, 02:19 PM   #35
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this is great thread, thanks for writing it and the nice pictures.

I have a 2007 E92 w/ 90k miles. Never had any problems so far but I think my HPFP is starting to fail. Got the engine in limp mode twice, got both P142E and P3090 err codes. I've been looking for options to get a new pump and replace it myself. According to this thread as of 2015 the latest and greatest PN is 13517616170. Now doing a search for this comes back with prices ~$150 for remanufactured/refurbished and from $450-$900 for new. I have to do more research but it's just wired that there's such a big difference in prices from different sources. Not sure what/who to believe.
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      03-18-2018, 06:10 AM   #36
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I just did this job and I didn't take off the manifold at all. I also purchased a remanned unit from BMW of Seattle for $350 which comes with a two year warranty (no mileage restrictions) and full labor plus parts. I figured that's worth it if it messes up THEY will fix it this time.

Regardless thanks for the write up!
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      03-19-2018, 03:13 AM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DenoirN54 View Post
I just did this job and I didn't take off the manifold at all. I also purchased a remanned unit from BMW of Seattle for $350 which comes with a two year warranty (no mileage restrictions) and full labor plus parts. I figured that's worth it if it messes up THEY will fix it this time.

Regardless thanks for the write up!
Yeah I followed this guide and it was so helpful.

We could not get the junction box off the intake manifold, no matter how hard we tried (my father was a mechanic for 20+ years and even he couldn't). It was so hard and brittle, the plastic was just stretching when trying to release the clips.

So like you, we did it without removing the manifold. Pain in the arse though!
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      04-21-2018, 10:55 PM   #38
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+ no intake manifold removal required.

the 3rd bolt removal is not as scary as it seems at first. you just need to insert the 5mil with the extension while looking from above between the intake manifold openings. once in place, just attach the handle and turn to unscrew

thanks for write up!
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      11-22-2018, 06:19 PM   #39
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good effort bud
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      11-23-2018, 02:12 PM   #40
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Thank you for the awesome DIY! This helped me get going on this job and my car is running like a dream now with no long cranks. Rail pressure is immensely better.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Gabb View Post
+ no intake manifold removal required.

the 3rd bolt removal is not as scary as it seems at first. you just need to insert the 5mil with the extension while looking from above between the intake manifold openings. once in place, just attach the handle and turn to unscrew

thanks for write up!
Agreed, this is exactly what I did when I replaced HPFP this month. The third bolt is a pain in the butt to access but thankfully is the hardest part of the job other than the stupid black electrical box.
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      11-30-2018, 01:35 PM   #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stuart@BMRAutowerkes View Post
My HPFP needed changing, here is my DIY.

Disclaimer: you do this at your own risk. Professional installation is encouraged.

Estimated time: 6hours* (highly recommended to let the car cool down overnight. I basically removed everything besides the fuel pump during the night, then the next morning removed the fuel pump itself. This will let the pressure in the fuel lines subside a bit plus will reduce your chances of getting burnt)

Tools you will need:
8mm socket
10mm socket
11mm socket
5mm hex (short Ė i.e youíll be using this in a tight *******
5mm hex (long Ė youíll be using this to reach past other obtrusions)
T20 torx
T25 torx
E12 female torx
17mm OE spanner
18mm OE spanner
24mm OE spanner
Flathead screwdriver
Microfibre towel / shop rag

You can order it from Tischer here

OK the HPFP replacement can be broken down into around 9 steps of varying difficulty:
1. Removing microfilter & cowl (very easy)
2. Removing airbox (very easy)
3. Removing chargepipe (easy)
4. Removing throttle body (moderate)
5. Removing engine cover (easy)
6. Removing intake manifold (moderate)
7. Disconnecting fuel lines (easy)
8. Removing fuel pump (moderate)
9. Putting it all back together


Step 1: Removing microfilter & cowl
Tools needed: 8mm socket & flathead screwdriver
- Unclip the small black cover on both the driver side and passenger side and wiggle the rubber grommets free from the cover.
- Unscrew the 6 x 8mm bolts holding the microfilter down (red arrows)
- Unscrew the 2 x 8mm bolts holding the cowl in place (blue arrows)
- Disconnect the ambient temperature sensor by unclipping it (green star)
- If your car is fitted with an alarm, disconnect the alarm sensor (yellow star)
- Use your flat head screwdriver to unclip the part of the cowl that attaches to the cabling running through your engine bay (green arrow)

Attachment 651005

Step 2: Removing airbox
Tools needed: Flathead screwdriver

Assuming you still have your OEM airbox, use your flathead screwdriver to pry open the 7 metal tabs holding the lid in place.
Then using your flathead screwdriver, unscrew the two collars holding piping in place (indicated by the red arrows)
The airbox should now just be held in place by three rubber grommets on the underside of the airbox, gentle rocking back and forth combined with a bit of a yank should free the airbox.
Now, disconnect the vacuum hose fitting indicated in the second pic in the red circle. Simply squeeze the sides together and lift up.

Attachment 651006
Attachment 651007

Step 3:Removing chargepipe
Tools needed: Flathead screwdriver, T20 torx (and in my case 8mm socket)

I have an ER chargepipe, so if youíre still OEM, thereís another DIY for removal.
Unscrew the collar (blue circle) with a flathead screwdriver, unbolt the collar (red circle) with an 8mm socket. Itís likely your car will be different, but itís not rocket science youíll be able to figure it out
Then, up near the Ďtop endí of the charge pipe we need to remove an electrical sensor with our T20 (2 screws) indicated by the red arrows, and then use your flathead screwdriver to pry open the clip holding the chargepipe to the intake manifold. Wiggle the sensor out... if your chargepipe has a BOV, slide the vacuum line off the back of it. No pic right now but Iíll show you one later.

Attachment 651008
Attachment 651009

Step 4: Removing throttle body
Tools needed: 10mm socket

There are 4 x 10mm fasteners holding the throttle body to the intake manifold. Use your socket to undo them. There is also a vacuum line leading out of the back of the throttle body, squeeze and rotate this and it should come off. The last sensor is fairly obvious, however I couldnít get mine undone. If you can, great, remove the throttle body altogether and keep it in a safe clean place. If youíre like me and canít get it undone, just lay the throttle body to the side of the engine bay Ė thereís plenty of slack in the cable, and cover it with a cloth of some sort to prevent any debris from contaminating it.

Attachment 651010
Attachment 651011
Attachment 651012

Step 5: Removing engine cover
Tools needed: TBA

4 fasteners. Undo them. Lift the cover off and remove gently. Done.
Note: some cars will have a crankcase breather line... mine didnít so I canít show you pics on it. If yours doesnít have it, it will just be a plug like in the pic below. If you do have it, I donít think itís too hard to disconnect.

Attachment 651013
Attachment 651014

Step 6: Removing intake manifold
Tools needed: T20 torx and 11m socket

Letís start with the intake manifold sensor, use your T20 torx to undo the 2 screws holding the sensor in place .
Attachment 651016

Then slide the wiring harness junction box off the bracket on the underside of the intake manifold.
Attachment 651017

There is an oil pressure sensor switch up near the oil filter (red star), so use your fingers/flat head screwdriver to undo this, keep the clip safe and lay the sensor to the side.
Grab your 11mm socket and undo 7 x 11mm fasteners holding the intake manifold to the engine block. In this photo Iíve marked the obvious ones with a red arrow, but you shouldnít have trouble finding the others.
Attachment 651018

Removing the manifold itself can get a bit tricky due to space constraints... the piping down the back near the firewall will require a bit of a tug and pull away for the manifold to slide out. Once itís clear though, itís smooth sailing.
Attachment 651019

Your engine should now look like this
Attachment 651020

Step 7: Disconnecting fuel line
Tools needed: 24mm spanner, 11mm and 17mm spanner (could be 18, I canít remember), E12 female torx.

This is probably the most hazardous part of the install. The fuel is stored under quite great pressure... however I left the car overnight so when I undid it there were zero dramas, about a teaspoon of fuel dropped out and I had a microfiber there to catch it. For safety sake, undo the fuel line nuts very slowly and wear goggles/protective clothing.
Red circle: use your 24mm spanner to unscrew this fuel line pressure sensor
Green circle: unclips
Blue circle: E12 torx Ė undo this fastener
Yellow star: Iíve forgotten to take a good picture, but this is where youíll find the two fuel line nuts, theyíre pretty obvious. Undo them with a 17 (or 18mm Ė canít remember) spanner. Do the left one first. Move the fuel line out of the way.
Attachment 651021

Next, use your 11mm socket to undo this fastener (red circle).
Use your 17mm spanner to again undo the fuel line nuts (blue circles). Move the fuel line out of the way.
Attachment 651022
Attachment 651023

Step 8: Removing fuel pump
Tools needed: 5mm hex keys (long and short) and a microfibre towel
Now onto the fuel pump. There are 3 x 5mm hex fasteners holding the fuel pump in place.
In this pic, ignore that I havenít removed the fuel lines yet, the pics are just a bit out of order...
You can see the red circle where you will need to use your 5mm hex key to undo the nuts... for the Ďback oneí i.e. closest to the engine block, use the long hex key and go around the fuel pump. Youíll figure it out.
Attachment 651024

Once the fuel pump starts to become loose you can gently wiggle it out... a bit of oil and fuel will dribble out here. Have your MF handy to clean it up. In my case, barely any came out.

Letís compare old and new...
Attachment 651025

Where the fuel pump used to be. This is where the oil will dribble out to. Iíve since cleaned it up.
Attachment 651026


Step 9.

And youíre done (well almost). Put everything back together in a similar fashion to how it was disassembled... youíll figure it out.
The fuel line nuts should be torqued to 30nm but if you donít have a torque wrench just do them tight, without applying excess force. Last thing you will want is to bend/break your fuel line.
Start her up Ė there will be a long crank as the fuel line repressurises and fuel goes through the HPFP for the first time, but then you should be good to go.

Whenever I removed a screw/nut/fastener I wrote it down just in case I forgot where to put it, here's my chart if it helps you:
Attachment 651027

Stuart. No homo I love you. That was one of the hardest jobs I did -- because I didn't take the manifold off and I have an N55. Very good guy. Thank you so much. Mine failed at 80k. I guessed that it was the hpfp based on other posts and she runs perfectly now.

Time to change the headers back now and tune her. 😈
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