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      01-19-2016, 01:07 AM   #1
paradoxical3
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Guide to BMW's electronic nannies (coding off e-diff and much more)

For a long time, me and a few other guys have been working on figuring out how to code off the electronic nannies that these cars have. Even with DTC an DSC off, there are still tons of safety systems in place - many of which I was not aware of until I started doing research.

Now that I have coded all of them off in my car, I thought it would be useful to compile the information into one place. This would have really helped me when I was trying to figure it all out. Things I have actually disabled and tested myself on the race track:

Electronic Differential
Engine Power Reduction to Prevent Brake Disc Overheating
Brake Fading Compensation
Hydraulic Brake Assist
Maximum Brake Support
Brake Standby
Dynamic Performance Control

Some of these are interfering everyday during normal driving, such as hydraulic brake assist. I didn't even notice it until I turned it off and had an "Eureka" moment.

All of these things suck for track use and spirited driving. I am posting here instead of the track forum because virtually nobody visits that subforum, but I feel this is info that could help every enthusiast that actually likes driving hard.

You can read the full description of the nannies and the proper setting to turn them off here:

http://www.onelapx1.com/the-story/ho...w-actually-fun

Hope it helps!
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      01-19-2016, 03:44 PM   #2
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I had no idea there was this much "thinking" going on behind the scenes, pretty impressive if you ask me. Not great for a track I guess, but on the street it all makes sense. Well done BMW... well done
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      01-19-2016, 03:56 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Volasko View Post
I had no idea there was this much "thinking" going on behind the scenes, pretty impressive if you ask me. Not great for a track I guess, but on the street it all makes sense. Well done BMW... well done
I agree - certain features are really useful for the average consumer on the street. After checking out the safety features present in the DSC I would feel very confident letting someone I love drive a BMW.

But on the track, it's pretty bad. I just wish that there was some kind of option pack (like M-Sport) you could option that disabled some of these, or an optional track pack like Ford offers with the Mustang.
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      01-19-2016, 04:32 PM   #4
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I just learned way more than I thought I ever would about the "E90 based" X1. I didn't realize it was so closely related to the E90 down to the hydraulic steering, rear end, etc... Kind of a great option for those like me that love the E90 335, but could use some more storage/people space and still retain the M-Sport options!
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      01-19-2016, 04:36 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajderr2000 View Post
I just learned way more than I thought I ever would about the "E90 based" X1. I didn't realize it was so closely related to the E90 down to the hydraulic steering, rear end, etc... Kind of a great option for those like me that love the E90 335, but could use some more storage/people space and still retain the M-Sport options!
Unfortunately, the new (2016+) X1 is basically a mini with a BMW name on it. Only the E84 (2013-2015) X1s are based on the E90. On the plus side, The E84 X1s are depreciating an insane amount and you can pick them up dirt cheap. Though N55 M-sport models are starting to get rare, so that might up the price a bit.

Last edited by paradoxical3; 01-19-2016 at 04:43 PM..
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      01-19-2016, 05:49 PM   #6
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Great job with the explanations and cataloging all the work. Glad I was able to contribute for the 335i crowd with your help
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      01-19-2016, 05:51 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by dbworld4k View Post
Great job with the explanations and cataloging all the work. Glad I was able to contribute for the 335i crowd with your help
Thanks, do you have a TRC file of your DSC module you can send me? I want to make sure my listings of the parameters are accurate and I can't remember if the xdrive DSC module has different acronyms than the normal DSC module. It will just be easier to list what wert levels the RWD guys need to set it to instead of telling them to figure it out via hex data.
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      01-19-2016, 05:52 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paradoxical3
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbworld4k View Post
Great job with the explanations and cataloging all the work. Glad I was able to contribute for the 335i crowd with your help
Thanks, do you have a TRC file of your DSC module you can send me? I want to make sure my listings of the parameters are accurate and I can't remember if the xdrive DSC module has different acronyms than the normal DSC module.
Wish I could, but I've sold my 335i

I'll obtain it next time I code a 335i though.
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      01-19-2016, 06:06 PM   #9
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Very interesting stuff. Any idea if these apply to the N52 as well?
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      01-19-2016, 06:30 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by RossTheBoss View Post
Very interesting stuff. Any idea if these apply to the N52 as well?
I believe they do, at least most of them. I am trying to get a TRC of a 328i as well; I will be able to tell for certain if someone sends them to me. But I know that the parameters are there in a 128i, so they should be as well in the 328i.
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      01-19-2016, 06:48 PM   #11
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Are all of these systems active or partially active even when DSC is totally disabled (holding down DTC for 5 or so seconds)? Im assuming they are, if you took the time to research them heavily.

Great write up and loads of useful info here. Should be sticked!
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      01-19-2016, 06:50 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EJB1990 View Post
Are all of these systems active or partially active even when DSC is totally disabled (holding down DTC for 5 or so seconds)? Im assuming they are, if you took the time to research them heavily.

Great write up and loads of useful info here. Should be sticked!
Yes, that is the main problem with them. This whole thing came about because as I became faster on the track (I always track with DSC and DTC off), the car would exhibit extremely strange behavior. It would cut power, the brakes would be all over the place, but the most frustrating thing was that it would not throw a code. I would have to apologize to people following me on-track for erratic driving, saying stuff like: "I swear to God, I am being smooth on the throttle but the car is cutting power by itself!" It sounded like excuses, but it was true.

I thought I was going nuts - I knew something was wrong with the car, but all of the systems said it was fine. Once I started researching and coding stuff off, it was as if I had gotten a new car. I knew I wasn't crazy!
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      03-12-2019, 08:38 PM   #13
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OP...would love to reference your site but it is down and your inbox is full. I read it previously and thought it was a great resource.... getting setup to code my own track car.
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      03-12-2019, 10:05 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AndyW View Post
OP...would love to reference your site but it is down and your inbox is full. I read it previously and thought it was a great resource.... getting setup to code my own track car.
I backed up the content of most of the site to a local Evernote:


http://www.onelapx1.com/blog/how-to-...w-actually-fun


Electronic nannies are a veritable alphabet soup of joy-sucking, fun-killing, brake-destroying awfulness. DSC, DTC, HBA, EVB, HPS, and Maximum Brake Support are all BMW acronyms that stand for the same thing - SLOW. Each and every one of these electronic safety devices are designed for the average consumer; not your hardcore automotive enthusiast. It is surprising to me that information on how to disable these "features" is not more widely available.


While the race to integrate technology into cars has cost us some raw dynamic pleasure, one benefit is that almost everything in a modern car is programmable - if you know how to do it. In the BMW world, we call it "coding." Coding is essentially the act of using BMW diagnostic software to access computer "modules" that control various parts of your car. This software allows you to read out the various options available and change them to suit your preferences. Generally there are two types of options for each coding parameter: "aktiv" or "nicht_aktiv," and level based entries where you will choose "levels" such as "wert_01," "wert_02," etc. Coding can be confusing to set up, but a little perseverance can go a long way towards customizing your car. Luckily for us, all of these electronic nannies can be found and modified in your DSC (dynamic stability control) module. The name of this module varies depending on what car you have, but as an xDrive N55 car these nannies were located in the DSC_84.C04 file of my XDSC module. Explaining how to set up your computer for coding is beyond the scope of this blog, but I will provide which options you need to disable, and what the proper setting is.
I hope it will be useful to have the description of these nannies consolidated in one place. This information is scattered all over the internet; I would have appreciated having it in one place when I was doing my own research. Each of these nannies are present on N52, N54 and N55 vehicles, including the 128i, 135i, 238i, 335i, 535i, and X1. The following chart is organized with the name of the electronic nanny followed by the acronym it is listed as in BMW's DSC module files.
Please note - if the option in your DSC module appears different (for example, it you have various "werts" as an option instead of "nicht_aktiv" or "aktiv"), you can examine the hex data in the entry to see what the various "wert" levels are. For example, the N54 335i electronic differential setting is not a simple on/off setting, but the hex data for "wert_01" is equivalent to "nicht_aktiv." You can refer to this thread for more info: http://www.e90post.com/forums/showthread.php?t=944126
The Definitive Guide to BMW's Joy-Killing Nannies
Engine Power Reduction to Prevent Brake Disc Overheating (FLR)
N55 X1 Parameter: e84_FLR
N54 335i xDrive Parameter: FLR_C0F
This is the worst of them all. Modern BMWs will actively cut the throttle in the middle of your track day if it has reason to believe that your brake pads are overheating. Normally, this wouldn't be such a bad thing - nobody wants to crash into ARMCO going 140mph. The problem is, your BMW doesn't actually have temperature sensors anywhere in the braking system. The computer relies on a "calculated" brake disc temperature based on several inputs including ground speed, brake pedal application force, and the frequency with which the electronic differential applies "torque-vectoring" braking. Your BMW has no way to know that you installed a Stoptech Big Brake Kit with Castrol SRF fluid and Performance Friction PFC01 pads. It just assumes you are running the stock system and cuts your throttle based on values that would overheat the OEM brake pads. Unacceptable to say the least, and occasionally dangerous. It was not a good experience braking from 145mph down to 45mph with a GT3 three feet off my rear bumper, only to have zero power coming out of the turn. This could very plausibly cause an accident on track.
To disable, set to "nicht_aktiv."
Brake Fading Compensation (HPS)
N55 X1 Parameter: e84_HPS
N54 335i xDrive Parameter: HPS
It is insane that a "performance" car has this feature. Brake fade compensation "calculates" the temperature of your fluid in a similar manner to the above "Engine Power Reduction to Prevent Brake Disc Overheating" parameter does. The higher the calculated temperature of your brake fluid (remember, there is no real sensor), the more hydraulic assist will be added to your brake pedal. In theory, this masks brake fade on the street. On the track, it makes a consistent brake pedal literally impossible. If you are tracking the car, you should have upgraded pads and fluid; you should never experience brake fade. Disabling this feature maintains the pedal's linearity and enjoyable feel throughout an entire 45 minute track session.
To disable, set to "nicht_aktiv".
Hydraulic Brake Assist (HBA)
N55 X1 Parameter: e84_HBA
N54 335i xDrive Parameter: HBA_DXC_8
In the event of an emergency braking maneuver, the average driver does not brake hard enough to sufficiently stop the car. Thus, BMW implemented hydraulic braking assist. This feature monitors ground speed, brake pedal pressure, and rate of deceleration to understand when the car is in an emergency braking situation. It then increases pressure up to the threshold of ABS to assist the driver in stopping safely. Once again, on the street this is a good idea. In Cincinnati, there is utter carnage on the highway whenever the slightest rain falls. The Ohio River runs red with blood from traffic accidents, and the roads look like a battle scene from Game of Thrones. Implementing an additional safety feature such as this probably helps most people, but on the track it is a disaster. It ruins your ability to brake hard and quickly, assuming the end of each high speed straight is an impending accident. Disable this feature for a super-linear pedal that will require noticeably more effort towards the end of the pedal travel. Be careful with this on the street the first few times you use it - you will find that it activates more often than one would expect. You will have to use a bit more braking pressure towards the end of the pedal than you are used to, but you will be rewarded with a wonderful, linear feel.
To disable, set to "nicht_aktiv". You can also set three levels of assist; "wert_01", "wert_02", and "wert_03". Default value is "wert_03".
Brake Standby (EVB)
N55 X1 Parameter: e84_EVB
N54 335i xDrive Parameter: EVB
This is another ridiculous feature that works well on the road, but terribly on track. If your car detects an aggressive throttle lift-off, it will pre-tension the brakes in anticipation of a hard braking maneuver. This would actually be great if it wasn't for what it does next - if you don't brake within 8 seconds of throttle lift-off, it un-tensions the brakes. I have a theory that people who think they are experiencing pad knock-back on the track are actually just being victimized by this "feature." Turn it off for a more consistent brake pedal that responds predictably.
To disable, set to "nicht_aktiv".
Maximum Brake Support (HVV)
N55 X1 Parameter: e84_HVV
N54 335i xDrive Parameter: HVV
This feature alters the front/rear split of the ABS braking system under emergency braking. At threshold braking when the front tires get into ABS before the rears lock, maximum brake support will increase the brake pressure on the rear pistons to equalize with the front. In theory, this reduces stopping distance. On the street, it probably does - particularly when the car has a heavy cargo load. On the track, it can upset the balance of the car and reduce reaction time. During threshold braking, sometimes one activates ABS accidentally and quickly backs off; maximum brake support will interfere here and get you "stuck" in ABS for a second or two. I recommend turning this off on the track, but it does not have as big of an impact as the other settings do.
To disable, set to "nicht_aktiv".
Dynamic Performance Control (FDB)
N55 X1 Parameter: e84_FDB
N54 335i xDrive Parameter: FDB
This feature encompasses two things - corner braking designed to "torque vector" and redirecting the power through the xDrive system for a 20/80 FWD/RWD torque split. I am conflicted on this option, and need to do more testing on the implications. Without a doubt, this feature accelerates brake pad wear - if you are driving with a decent amount of slip angle, it will be almost constantly corner braking. Traditional logic holds that corner braking is a worse way to torque vector than mechanical LSDs are and that's probably still true, but recently supercars such as the McLaren 650S started coming with corner braking torque vectoring. Granted, the software in a McLaren is hopefully more advanced than that in an entry level sedan (BMW 335i) but the point holds - there must be something to it if supercar manufacturers are going in that direction. What is frustrating about the X1/335i is that you can't separate the 80% RWD bias (an unquestionably good thing) from the brake-based torque vectoring (possibly a bad thing)? So, what's the upshot? I think it probably goes something like this:
1. Base car without this option - code it on for a nice performance boost!
2. M-sport pack that comes with it enabled, but no mechanical LSD - leave it on
3. Car with an upgraded mechanical rear LSD - ?????
I will experiment more with this feature, but my gut says that with a mechanical LSD installed in the rear, having the 80% RWD split will outweigh the drawbacks of the corner braking in terms of lap time.
To disable, set to "nicht_aktiv".
Electronic Differential (AX_Ref_Diff_Lock)
N55 X1 Parameter: e84_AX_Ref_Diff_Lock
N54 335i xDrive Parameter: AX_Ref
Let's be honest, this is really why you're reading the blog. Everyone who has installed a mechanical limited slip differential wants to disable the rear electronic differential. This option is similar to the X1s "Dynamic Performance Control," but on a more basic level. The premise is that with an electronic differential, your BMW will brake the spinning wheel to send torque to the wheel with traction. The problem is, this isn't a very good torque transfer in terms of mechanical efficiency. Installing a mechanical limited slip differential such as a Wavetrac (my choice) in the rear will allow you drastically better traction and mid-corner adjustability. The problem is, unless you disable this e-diff it will be fighting the mechanical LSD and never really allow your actual differential the freedom to do it's thing. If you have a mechanical LSD installed, do yourself a favor and disable this. If you don't have a mechanical LSD, leave it on. At least, until you immediately run out and buy a real LSD (you should).
To disable, set to "nicht_aktiv".
Here is an example of what the stability control module coding looks like in the program NCS Dummy. There are many more options than I have identified here, but I believe I have highlighted everything that has an impact on performance driving.


Turning all of these options off gained me about two seconds on a 1:45 second track. More importantly, it made my car extremely fun to drive.
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      03-13-2019, 01:12 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DerekGates View Post
I backed up the content of most of the site to a local Evernote:
Thx, Derek!
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      03-13-2019, 04:53 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AndyW View Post
OP...would love to reference your site but it is down and your inbox is full. I read it previously and thought it was a great resource.... getting setup to code my own track car.
archive.org is your new best friend
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      03-14-2019, 09:33 AM   #17
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Just when you thought you knew all the secret options of your car, your mind gets blown again. I think the one option I want to get rid of for even street driving is the Engine Power Reduction to Prevent Brake Disc Overheating (FLR); it almost sounds dangerous. I think the other options are good for street use.

I used NCS dummie and was able to find all of these options, but they are labelled on my car C0A and not C0F. I've attached my trace file.
I assume the difference is because I don't have a 335i?

Regarding removing the eDiff, I'm not sure this is a good idea for street use, same for the braking assist features, thoughts?

I used this video as guidance:

by LMB335IS
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File Type: txt fsw_psw_328i.txt (2.1 KB, 235 views)

Last edited by mecheng77; 03-14-2019 at 11:18 AM..
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      11-12-2022, 07:22 PM   #18
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I tried to apply some of these settings with NCSExpert SG_CODEREN.
Everything seems to have worked, no errors and I can even hear some clicking under the car after the flashing is finished.
The problem is, when I go back and do a READ of the BDSC, the trace file shows me that NONE of the options have been kept.

I have flashed most other modules in my 2009 328i xdrive with specific options and never had this issue before.

Anyone see this on their end? Settings that just don't stick.

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